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Effects of Motivational Interviewing for Incarcerated Adolescents on Driving Under the Influence after Release

Authors

  • L. A. R. Stein PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Rhode Island, Psychology Department & Cancer Prevention Research Center, Kingston, Rhode Island
    2. The Rhode Island Training School, Cranston, Rhode Island
    3. Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
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  • Suzanne M. Colby PhD,

    1. Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
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  • Nancy P. Barnett PhD,

    1. Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
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  • Peter M. Monti PhD,

    1. Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
    2. The Providence VA, Providence, Rhode Island
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  • Charles Golembeske PhD,

    1. The Rhode Island Training School, Cranston, Rhode Island
    2. Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
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  • Rebecca Lebeau-Craven MPH

    1. University of Rhode Island, Psychology Department & Cancer Prevention Research Center, Kingston, Rhode Island
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  • Dr. Stein is at the University of Rhode Island.

Address correspondence to Dr. Stein, Department of Psychology, University of Rhode Island, Cancer Prevention Research Center, Kingston, RI 02881. E-mail: LARStein@uri.edu.

Abstract

Motivational Interviewing (MI) to reduce alcohol and marijuana-related driving events among incarcerated adolescents was evaluated. Adolescents were randomly assigned to receive MI or Relaxation Training. Follow-up assessment showed that, as compared to RT, adolescents who received MI had lower rates of drinking and driving, and being a passenger in a car with someone who had been drinking. Effects were moderated by levels of depression. At low levels of depression, MI evidenced lower rates of these behaviors; at high levels of depression, effects for MI and RT were equivalent. Similar patterns were found for marijuana-related risky driving, but effects were nonsignificant.

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