Gender Differences in Seven-Year Alcohol and Drug Treatment Outcomes among Older Adults

Authors

  • Derek D. Satre PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, California
    2. Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California Region, Oakland, California
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  • Frederic C. Blow PhD,

    1. Serious Mental Illness Treatment Research and Evaluation Center, Ann Arbor VA Healthcare System and Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
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  • Felicia W. Chi MPH,

    1. Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California Region, Oakland, California
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  • Constance Weisner DrPH, LCSW

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, California
    2. Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California Region, Oakland, California
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  • This article is not subject to United States copyright laws.

Address correspondence to Dr. Satre, Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, 401 Parnassus Avenue, Box 0984, San Francisco, CA 94143. E-mail: dereks@lppi.ucsf.edu

Abstract

This study examined participants at seven-year follow-up to assess long-term outcomes of older women (n = 25) and men (n = 59) ages 55 and over in an outpatient addiction program. It measured demographic characteristics, alcohol and drug use, psychiatric symptoms, Addiction Severity Index, treatment length, and outcomes. At seven years, 76.0% of women reported abstinence in the prior 30 days versus 54.2% of men, p = .05. Logistic regression analysis found that longer treatment stay predicted abstinence. Findings indicate that older women have better long-term addiction outcome than older men, but treatment length is more significant than gender in predicting outcome.

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