Metabolic effects of the consumption of Areca catechu

Authors

  • B. J. Boucher,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Diabetes and Metabolic Medicine, Medical and Dental School, Queen Mary, University of London, Royal London Hospital, Whitechapel, London, UK
      B. J. Boucher, Department of Diabetes and Metabolic Medicine, Medical and Dental School, Queen Mary, University of London, Royal London Hospital, Whitechapel, London E1 1BB, UK.
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  • N. Mannan

    1. Department of Diabetes and Metabolic Medicine, Medical and Dental School, Queen Mary, University of London, Royal London Hospital, Whitechapel, London, UK
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B. J. Boucher, Department of Diabetes and Metabolic Medicine, Medical and Dental School, Queen Mary, University of London, Royal London Hospital, Whitechapel, London E1 1BB, UK.

Abstract

Abstract Betel nut (Areca catechu) is chewed regularly by at least 10% of the world population, imported by immigrant users wherever they settle, and is the fourth most widely used addictive substance. It is thought, by users, to soothe the digestion and to be a stimulant and its use has a major role in social situations. Specific arecal alkaloids act as competitive inhibitors of GABA receptors and have widespread effects in the body, including actions on the brain, cardiovascular system, lungs, gut and pancreas. Nitrosated derivatives of arecal alkaloids, proven carcinogens inducing tumours throughout the upper gut and foregut derivatives in animals, are also associated with increased tumour risks in man. These nitrosated compounds are also diabetogenic in CD1 mice, producing a type 2 diabetes with obesity. Increased central obesity is found in association with betel usage in man as well as increases in circulating markers of inflammatory and cardiovascular damage. The effects of chronic betel usage in man are at least as diverse as those of smoking and the habit increases the risks of ill health.

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