Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Psychosis: A Call to Action

Authors


Address correspondence to Kirn T. Mueser, NH-Dartmouth Psychiatric Research Center, Main Building, 105 Pleasant St., Concord, NH 03301. E-mail: kirn.t.rnueser@dartrnouth.edu

Abstract

Spurred by Caudiano's (this issue) excellent review of research supporting cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for psychosis, we address the question of why CBT is so rarely provided to persons with schizophrenia and other severe mental illnesses in the United States, in contrast to Great Britain, where it has become widely available. We identify potential factors contributing to this difference, including greater skepticism about the benefits of psychotherapy for persons with severe mental illness, over-optimism concerning the clinical benefits of polypharmacy, and the traditional separation between psychology and psychiatry in the United States as compared to Great Britain. We provide a call to action for the field of clinical psychology to commit to training psychologists in the treatment of severe mental illness, including CBT, and for the field of psychiatry to incorporate training in CBT as a standard and required competency.

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