From Death Anxiety to Meaning Making at the End of Life: Recommendations for Psychological Assessment

Authors

  • Robert A. Neimeyer

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Memphis
      Address correspondence to Robert A. Neimeyer, Department of Psychology, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, 38152. E-mail: neimeyer@memphis.edu
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Address correspondence to Robert A. Neimeyer, Department of Psychology, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, 38152. E-mail: neimeyer@memphis.edu

Abstract

Although careful assessment and intervention for depression can improve psychological research and practice with patients at the end of life, attention to this focal problem should be supplemented by a broader evaluation of factors relevant to both risk and resilience. In particular, substantial research on the assessment of suicidality, death attitudes, and grief has yielded an array of methods for evaluating additional domains of patient and family functioning of high relevance to end-of-life care. This article discusses some of the specific advantages of assessment tools targeting each domain and provides citations to comprehensive psychometric reviews in each area.

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