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Image-Guided Endoscopic Surgery: Results of Accuracy and Performance in a Multicenter Clinical Study Using an Electromagnetic Tracking System

Authors

  • Marvin P. Fried MD,FACS,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otology and Laryngology, Harvard Medical School; Joint Center for Otolaryngology; Division of Otolaryngology, Beth Israel Deaconness Medical Center, and Brighman & Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
    • Marvin P. Fried, MD, 333 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, U.S.A.
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  • Jonathan Kleefield MD,

    1. Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconness Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts
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  • Harsha Gopal MD,

    1. Department of Otology and Laryngology, Harvard Medical School; Joint Center for Otolaryngology; Division of Otolaryngology, Beth Israel Deaconness Medical Center, and Brighman & Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
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  • Edward Reardon MD,

    1. Department of Otology and Laryngology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary; Carney Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
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  • Bryan T. Ho MD,

    1. Department of Otology and Laryngology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary; Carney Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
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  • Frederick A. Kuhn MD

    1. Department of Otolaryngology, The Georgia Ear Institute, Memorial Medical Center, Savannah, Georgia.
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  • Presented at the COSM Meeting in Orlando, Florida, May 8, 1996.

Abstract

Image-guided surgery has recently been described in the literature as a useful technology for improved functional endoscopic sinus surgery localization. Image-guided surgery yields accurate knowledge of the surgical field boundaries, allowing safer and more thorough sinus surgery. We have previously reviewed our initial experience with The InstaTrak System. This article presents a multicenter clinical study (n=55) that assesses the system's capability for localizing structures in critical surgical sites. The purpose of this paper is to present quantitative data on accuracy and performance. We describe several new advances including an automated registration technique that eliminates the redundant computed tomography scan, compensation for head movement, and the ability to use interchangeable instruments.

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