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A Prospective Quality of Life Study of Patients With Laryngeal Carcinoma by Tumor Stage and Different Radiation Therapy Schedules

Authors

  • Eva Hammerlid MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    • Eva Hammerlid, MD, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, S-413 45 Göteborg, Sweden.
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  • Claes Mercke MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg University, Sweden.
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  • Marianne Sullivan PhD,

    1. Health Care Research Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg University, Sweden.
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  • Thomas Westin MD, PhD

    1. Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg University, Sweden.
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  • Supported by grants from the Swedish Cancer Society, the Assar Gabrielsson Foundation, the King Gustav V Jubilee Clinic Cancer Research Foundation in Riksforbund, Göteborg, the Syakenen Nilssons Forskningsfond, the Cancer and Trafikskadades Riksförbund, the Swedish and Göteborg Medical Societies, and the Medical Faculty, Göteborg University, Sweden.

Abstract

This study was designed to prospectively monitor the quality of life of laryngeal cancer patients, to compare the quality of life of patients with small tumors with that of patients with large tumors, and to test any quality of life difference in patients with small tumors treated with conventional versus hyperfractioned accelerated radiation therapy. Patients having had a laryngectomy within the study year were also analyzed separately. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Core Questionnaire (QLQ-C30), the EORTC Head and Neck Module (H&N-37), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) scale were administered six times during 1 year. These questionnaires were found to be suitable for measuring laryngeal cancer patients' quality of life longitudinally. The questionnaires were sensitive to differences in quality of life for small versus large tumors and showed that hyperfractioned accelerated radiation therapy was advantageous compared with conventional radiation therapy with respect to quality of life at the 1-year follow-up.

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