Get access

Oral Leukoplakias Show Numerical Chromosomal Aberrations Detected by Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization

Authors

  • Christian F. Lenz,

    1. **Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital, School of Medicine, Heidelberg, Germany. (C.F.L. and A.P. are predoctoral fellows.)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Andreas Pfuhl,

    1. **Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital, School of Medicine, Heidelberg, Germany. (C.F.L. and A.P. are predoctoral fellows.)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Martin Finckh MD,

    1. **Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital, School of Medicine, Heidelberg, Germany. (C.F.L. and A.P. are predoctoral fellows.)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Hagen Weidauer MD,

    1. **Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital, School of Medicine, Heidelberg, Germany. (C.F.L. and A.P. are predoctoral fellows.)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • X. Bosch Franz PhD

    Corresponding author
    1. **Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital, School of Medicine, Heidelberg, Germany. (C.F.L. and A.P. are predoctoral fellows.)
    • Franz X. Bosch, PhD, Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital, School of Medicine, Heidelberg, INF 400, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Presented in part at the Annual Meeting of the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie, Nuernberg, May 11, 1997.

Abstract

To examine at which stage in the multistep process of head and neck tumorigenesis numerical chromosomal alterations can be detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), biopsies and cell smear preparations of clinically healthy oral tissue, premalignant lesions (leukoplakias), and tumors were analyzed by FISH using chromosome-specific centromeric probes. Aberrations found in tumor biopsies and in tumor cell smears consisted of trisomy of chromosomes 1, 7, 10, and 17 and monosomy of chromosomes 1, 7, 9, 10, and 17. In five of eight dysplastic oral leukoplakia biopsies, aberrations were seen consisting of trisomy of chromosome 1, 7, and 17, and monosomy of chromosome 9. No aberrations were found in biopsies of hyperplastic lesions (n = 8), or in oral cell smears of persons at risk. Because numerical chromosomal aberrations seem to be highly specific for malignant cells, FISH may help to identify leukoplakias that have a high risk of malignant conversion.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary