A Laryngeal Dissection Station: Educational Paradigms in Phonosurgery

Authors

  • Seth H. Dailey MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otology and Laryngology, Harvard Medical School, Division of Otolaryngology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, U.S.A.
    • Dr. Seth H. Dailey, 333 Longwood Avenue, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02115, U.S.A.
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  • James B. Kobler PhD,

    1. Department of Otology and Laryngology, Harvard Medical School, Division of Laryngology and Voice and Speech laboratory, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA, U.S.A.
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  • Steven M. Zeitels MD

    1. Department of Otology and Laryngology, Harvard Medical School, Division of Laryngology and Voice and Speech laboratory, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA, U.S.A.
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  • Presented at the World Congress of Bronchology, Boston, MA, June 15, 2002.

Abstract

Objectives: To introduce a new tool for phonosurgical training and education. A multitude of innovations in complex laryngeal surgery has catalyzed new educational initiatives. Establishing dexterity in phonomicrosurgery is often difficult to achieve while working on patients because of the narrow margin for success. Furthermore, laryngoplastic phonosurgery and open partial laryngectomy require sophisticated knowledge of precise anatomic relationships, which can be difficult to express in images. Finally, many teaching programs do not have a high volume of these procedures, and there is a significant need to transmit this information in continuing education courses.

Study Design: Prototype design.

Methods: A laryngeal dissection station (LDS) was designed to facilitate the acquisition of high-level procedural skill sets for both transoral and transcervical techniques.

Results: This LDS can be used in existing temporal-bone laboratories by using cadaveric larynges. A rectangular frame supports two adjustable holders, one for the larynx and one for the examining speculum of a laryngoscope. Procedures are performed with the larynx fixed in space by a novel fixator. Variation in position and orientation of the components affords simulation of both microlaryngoscopy and open surgery. The dissection station can accommodate virtually any laryngoscope, regardless of size or shape.

Conclusions: This training apparatus should facilitate laryngeal surgical instruction in residency training and continuing medical education. This device and others like it can help establish clinical competency in laryngology, should this become necessary in future educational models of residency training and recertification.

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