Ethnicity and Psychiatric Comorbidity Among Alcohol-Dependent Persons Who Receive Inpatient Treatment: African Americans, Alaska Natives, Caucasians, and Hispanics

Authors

  • Michie N. Hesselbrock,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Social Work (MNH) and School of Medicine (VMH), University of Connecticut, West Hartford, Connecticut; University of Alaska (BS), Anchorage, Alaska; School of Medicine (MAS), University of California San Diego, San Diego, California; and Washington University School of Medicine (KB), St. Louis, Missouri.
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  • Victor M. Hesselbrock,

    1. School of Social Work (MNH) and School of Medicine (VMH), University of Connecticut, West Hartford, Connecticut; University of Alaska (BS), Anchorage, Alaska; School of Medicine (MAS), University of California San Diego, San Diego, California; and Washington University School of Medicine (KB), St. Louis, Missouri.
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  • Bernard Segal,

    1. School of Social Work (MNH) and School of Medicine (VMH), University of Connecticut, West Hartford, Connecticut; University of Alaska (BS), Anchorage, Alaska; School of Medicine (MAS), University of California San Diego, San Diego, California; and Washington University School of Medicine (KB), St. Louis, Missouri.
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  • Marc A. Schuckit,

    1. School of Social Work (MNH) and School of Medicine (VMH), University of Connecticut, West Hartford, Connecticut; University of Alaska (BS), Anchorage, Alaska; School of Medicine (MAS), University of California San Diego, San Diego, California; and Washington University School of Medicine (KB), St. Louis, Missouri.
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  • Kathy Bucholz

    1. School of Social Work (MNH) and School of Medicine (VMH), University of Connecticut, West Hartford, Connecticut; University of Alaska (BS), Anchorage, Alaska; School of Medicine (MAS), University of California San Diego, San Diego, California; and Washington University School of Medicine (KB), St. Louis, Missouri.
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  • Presented at the Workshop on Treatment Priorities and Health Disparities, September 24, 2002, Bethesda, Maryland.

Michie N. Hesselbrock, PhD, School of Social Work, University of Connecticut, 1798 Asylum Ave., West Hartford, CT 06117-2698; Fax: 860-570-9139; E-mail: michie.hesselbrock@uconn.edu.

Abstract

This study examined ethnic and gender differences of psychiatric comorbidity among alcohol dependent men and women from four ethnic groups: Alaska Native, Caucasians, African Americans, and Hispanics. The data were obtained through individual standardized interview; DSM-III-R diagnoses were obtained via a computer algorithm. The subjects inclued 1177 Caucasians, 361 African Americans, 93 Hispanics and 486 Alaska Natives. Significant ethnic differences were found in relation to age of onset of alcohol and multiple substance dependence and psychiatric comorbidity. Ethnic differences were also noted with regard to the health care utilizations.

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