Using Daily Interactive Voice Response Technology to Measure Drinking and Related Behaviors in a Pharmacotherapy Study

Authors

  • Henry R. Kranzler,

    Corresponding author
    1. Lowell P. Weicker, Jr. General Clinical Research Center, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut.
    2. Alcohol Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut.
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  • Khamis Abu-Hasaballah,

    1. Lowell P. Weicker, Jr. General Clinical Research Center, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut.
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  • Howard Tennen,

    1. Department of Community Medicine and Healthcare, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut.
    2. Alcohol Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut.
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  • Richard Feinn,

    1. Alcohol Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut.
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  • Kevin Young

    1. Alcohol Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut.
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  • Supported by NIH Grants P50 AA03510, K24 AA13736, and M01 RR06192 (University of Connecticut General Clinical Research Center).

Reprint requests: Henry R. Kranzler, MD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Connecticut Health Center, 263 Farmington Ave., Farmington, CT 06030-2103; Fax: 860-679-1316; E-mail: kranzler@psychiatry.uchc.edu.

Abstract

Background: Interactive voice response technology (IVR) allows investigators to collect daily measures of drinking, medication adherence, mood, and other treatment-relevant variables that may change day to day during a clinical trial. Despite these advantages, no published studies have used IVR in alcohol pharmacotherapy trials.

Methods: Subjects provided daily data via IVR during the 12-week treatment period. Seven subjects completed the trial.

Results: We found a high level of participant adherence to the IVR protocol, higher levels of drinking reported by IVR than by a commonly used recall method, and distinct within-day associations between daily mood and alcohol consumption: these could not be obtained through traditional assessment methods.

Conclusions: IVR seems to be feasible for the collection of daily indicators of treatment outcomes and processes in pharmacotherapy studies among problem drinkers.

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