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Inflammatory bowel disease in patients with celiac disease

Authors

  • Alice Yang MD,

    1. Department of Medicine, Pathology and Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York
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  • Yu Chen MPH,

    1. Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, New York, New York
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  • Ellen Scherl MD,

    1. Department of Medicine, Weill-Cornell School of Medicine, New York, New York
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  • Alfred I Neugut MD, PhD,

    1. Department of Medicine, Pathology and Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York
    2. Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, New York, New York
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  • Govind Bhagat MD,

    1. Department of Medicine, Pathology and Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York
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  • Peter H. R. Green MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Medicine, Pathology and Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York
    • 161 Fort Washington Avenue, Room 645, New York, New York 10032
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Abstract

Background: Several case reports and series report an association between celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, there is no current data assessing this association. We therefore studied the occurrence of these conditions in a cohort of patients with celiac disease seen at a referral center.

Methods: A database of patients with celiac disease seen between 1981 and 2002 was analyzed. Only biopsy-proven adults were included. Patients who had endoscopic and pathologic evidence of IBD were identified, and their pathology was reviewed. Age- and sex-adjusted prevalence rate ratios were determined by comparing results with population-based prevalence data.

Results: Among 455 patients with celiac disease, IBD was identified in 10 (5 had ulcerative colitis and 5 had Crohn's disease). This represented an age- and sex-adjusted prevalence rate ratio for ulcerative colitis of 3.56 (95% confidence interval, 1.48-8.56) and for Crohn's disease of 8.49 (95% confidence interval, 3.53-20.42).

Conclusion: Within our cohort of patients with celiac disease, IBD was significantly more common than in the general population.

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