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Keywords:

  • Otosclerosis;
  • pregnancy;
  • hearing loss

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the effect of pregnancy on the hearing of women with otosclerosis.

Study Design: A retrospective study of women who had undergone stapedectomy. The women were equally divided into two groups: one group with children and a control group without children. Air and bone conduction, as well as discrimination, were measured before and after stapedectomy in both groups.

Patients: Ninety-four women (47 with children and 47 without) were evaluated. Because many of the women had bilateral otosclerosis, the total number of ears studied was 128.

Results: Mean pure tone air and bone conduction thresholds were not worse in women with children versus those women without children. In fact, mean pre- and postoperative pure tone air and bone conduction thresholds from 500 Hz through 4,000 Hz in women with children were slightly but significantly better than women without children. There was no difference in discrimination scores between groups. Within the group with children, no significant correlation was found between number of children and hearing loss. Also, no correlation was found between breastfeeding and the amount of hearing loss.

Conclusion: We found no adverse effect on hearing in otosclerotic women who had children compared with women without children. Even with increasing numbers of pregnancies, no deleterious impact was noted. Air conduction, bone conduction, and discrimination were not worse in women with children versus childless women. No significant correlation was found between the number of children and hearing loss, and neither did breastfeeding affect the amount of hearing loss.