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Long-Term Follow-Up Results of Selective Laryngeal Adductor Denervation-Reinnervation Surgery for Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia

Authors

  • Dinesh K. Chhetri MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.
    • Dr. Dinesh K. Chhetri, 62-132 CHS, Head and Neck Surgery, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 90095
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  • Abie H. Mendelsohn BA,

    1. Division of Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.
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  • Joel H. Blumin MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology and Communication Sciences, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S.A.
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  • Gerald S. Berke MD

    1. Division of Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.
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Abstract

Selective laryngeal adductor denervation-reinnervation surgery for the treatment of adductor spasmodic dysphonia was reported in 1999 in 21 patients with encouraging results. Here, we report long-term results of this procedure. Surgical outcome was evaluated using patient surveys and perceptual voice assessment. Measured outcomes included Voice Handicap Index (VHI)-10 scores, patient questionnaire, and perceptual evaluation for voice breaks and breathiness. Patient survey was obtained from 83 patients, and perceptual voice evaluation was performed in voice samples from 46 patients. Average follow-up interval was 49 months. Mean VHI-10 scores improved from a mean of 35.6 to 12.7. Eighty-three percent showed significantly improved VHI-10 scores, representing improved physical, social, and emotional well-being. There was a high degree of patient satisfaction, with 91% agreeing that their voice is more fluent after the surgery. Perceptual evaluation of postoperative voice samples revealed voice breaks in 26% (15% mild, 4% moderate, 7% severe) and breathiness in 30% (11% mild, 13% moderate, 6% severe). A majority of patients had stable, long-lasting resolution of spasmodic voice breaks.

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