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An Ex Vivo Model for Reperfusion of Laryngotracheal Grafts

Authors

  • Emma Barker,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
    2. Department of Clinical Veterinary Sciences, University of Bristol, Langford, Bristol, UK
    • Emma Barker, ENT Department, Royal South Hants Hospital, Brintons Terrace, Southampton, SO14 0YG, UK.
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    • Emma Barker was funded by the MRC, Mick Bailey by the BBSRC, and Martin Birchall by the Wellcome Trust.

  • Paolo Macchiarini,

    1. Department of Clinical Veterinary Sciences, University of Bristol, Langford, Bristol, UK
    2. Department of Thoracic Surgery, Heidelhaus am Leineufer, Hannover, Germany.
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  • Pamela Murison,

    1. Department of Clinical Veterinary Sciences, University of Bristol, Langford, Bristol, UK
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  • Alan Jones,

    1. Department of Clinical Veterinary Sciences, University of Bristol, Langford, Bristol, UK
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  • Karin Haverson,

    1. Department of Clinical Veterinary Sciences, University of Bristol, Langford, Bristol, UK
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  • Mick Bailey,

    1. Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
    2. Department of Clinical Veterinary Sciences, University of Bristol, Langford, Bristol, UK
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  • Martin Birchall

    1. Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK
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  • This work was undertaken in the Department of Clinical Veterinary Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.

Abstract

Objective: To describe the development of an ex vivo model to facilitate the study of ischemia-reperfusion injury in laryngotracheal grafts taken from Minnesota minipigs.

Study Design: This is a descriptive study.

Methods: Laryngotracheal grafts from Minnesota minipigs were harvested and placed in cold storage for 3 hours. Autologous blood was used to reperfuse the graft for up to 8 hours using the described reperfusion model.

Results: By altering retrieval technique and pressures within the graft, we demonstrated healthy grafts after 8 hours of reperfusion.

Conclusions: Ex vivo reperfusion offers a range of experimental advantages over in vivo reperfusion including close control of interventions, ease of outcome measurement, and reduction in animal use. This model is now ready to be used for further studies of interventions to reduce ischemia-reperfusion injury in these grafts.

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