CD133, One of the Markers of Cancer Stem Cells in Hep-2 Cell Line

Authors

  • Liang Zhou MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Fudan University, Affiliated Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Hospital, Shanghai, China
    • Liang Zhou, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Fudan University Affiliated Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Hospital, 83 FenYang Road, 200031 Shanghai, China.
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  • Xudong Wei,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Fudan University, Affiliated Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Hospital, Shanghai, China
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  • Lei Cheng PhD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Fudan University, Affiliated Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Hospital, Shanghai, China
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  • Jie Tian,

    1. Central Laboratory, Fudan University Affiliated Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Hospital, Shanghai, China
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  • Jack J. Jiang

    1. Division of Otolaryngology-HNS, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, Wisconsin, U.S.A.
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  • This work was partly supported by NSFC grant 30328029.

Abstract

Objective: In recent years, a growing body of evidence has been reported that a tumor clone is organized as a hierarchy that originates from rare stem cells. CD133, a cell surface antigen, was identified as a stem cell maker for human leukemia, brain tumors, and prostate cancer. The purpose of this study was to detect the expression of CD133, a putative marker of cancer stem cells in the Hep-2 cell line, and isolate CD133 positive cells to observe their proliferation and differentiation ability in vitro.

Method: Immunocytochemical staining technology and flow cytometry were used to detect the expression of the putative stem cell marker CD133 in a Hep-2 cell line. The immunomagnetic beads were applied to purify CD133 positive cells. CD133+ tumor cells were cultured in vitro to observe their ability to proliferate and differentiate.

Results: Only a small proportion (<5%) of cells in the Hep-2 cell line expressed CD133. CD133+ cells possess a marked capacity for self renewal, extensive proliferation, and mutilineal differentiation potency in vitro.

Conclusion: CD133 is one of the markers for cancer stem cells in human laryngeal tumors, the Hep-2 cell line.

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