Static Facial Suspension With Surgisis ES (Enhanced Strength) Sling

Authors

  • Douglas D. Leventhal MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.
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  • Edmund A. Pribitkin MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.
    • Edmund A. Pribitkin, MD, Thomas Jefferson University Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, 925 Chestnut Street, 6th Floor, Philadelphia, PA 19107, U.S.A.
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  • Presented at the Triological Society's Annual Meeting, San Diego, California, U.S.A., April 26–29, 2007.

Abstract

Background: Static suspension procedures stabilize and support paralyzed facial muscles and enhance facial symmetry, appearance, mastication, and speech production in patients with facial palsy. A variety of autografts and allografts have been used for static facial suspension, but each has its limitations, and few studies document the efficacy or benefit of one substance over another. Xenograft tissue scaffoldings potentially offer both the compatibility of autografts and the convenience of allografts.

Objective: Pilot study to evaluate efficacy of Surgisis ES (Enhanced Strength) static facial suspension in a series of six patients with facial paralysis.

Methods: Retrospective chart review, illustrative case series, and review of the literature.

Results: Six patients with facial paralysis were treated with the Surgisis ES facial sling procedure. Four patients achieved satisfactory results after the initial procedure. One patient was displeased with the esthetic outcome and required a revision procedure to increase the tautness of the implant. In the initial four cases, the sling was tunneled subcutaneously and sutured to the muscle. In two cases, the sling was tunneled subcutaneously and subperiosteally, thereby suspending all the soft tissue in the midface.

Conclusion: Static facial suspension with Surgisis ES improved cosmesis and function in this limited pilot study. In particular, a two-plane dissection technique provided excellent results. Further studies need to be conducted to evaluate the ongoing benefit over time.

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