Secreting Jugulotympanic Paraganglioma With Venous Involvement into the Thorax

Authors

  • Opeyemi O. Daramola BS,

    Corresponding author
    1. From the University of Minnesota Medical School University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.A.
    • Send correspondence to Opeyemi O. Daramola, c/o Dr. Michael J. Shinners, University of Minnesota, Department of Otolaryngology, 420 Delaware Street S.E., MMC 396, Minneapolis, MN 55455
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  • Michael J. Shinners MD,

    1. Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.A., and the Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.A.
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  • Samuel C. Levine MD

    1. Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.A., and the Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.A.
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  • Presented at the 2008 Triological Society Meeting, Middle Section, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A., January 18–20, 2008. Editor's Note: This Manuscript was accepted for publication February 21, 2008.

Abstract

Paragangliomas are highly vascular tumors that arise from chief cells in extra-adrenal paraganglia of the autonomic nervous system. Jugulotympanic paragangliomas involve the middle ear and jugular fossa. Secreting jugulotympanic paragangliomas with thoracic extension are rare. We report a case with unexpected involvement of the internal jugular vein. Otolaryngologists should be aware that the jugulotympanic paragangliomas traverse variable anatomic pathways. Multiple imaging options, including magnetic resonance venography, are useful and should include the neck for definitive characterization of tumor anatomy. Patients with refractory hypertension and masses suspicious for paraganglioma should be examined for functional tumors.

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