Spontaneous Nasal Septal Perforation With Antiangiogenic Bevacizumab Therapy

Authors

  • Collin M. Burkart MD,

    1. From the Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A.
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  • Jedidiah J. Grisel MD,

    Corresponding author
    1. From the Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A.
    • Send correspondence to Jedidiah J. Grisel, MD, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Medical Sciences Building, Room 6508, 231 Albert Sabin Way Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45267-0528
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  • David B. Hom MD

    1. From the Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A.
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  • Editor's Note: This Manuscript was accepted for publication April 16, 2008.

Abstract

Otolaryngologists should be made aware of a newer cause of nasal septal perforations resulting from the more recent antiangiogenic therapy used to treat malignancies. This case describes a 52-year-old white woman who developed a spontaneous nasal septal perforation after given the antiangiogenic drug, bevacizumab, for metastatic ovarian cancer treatment. Bevacizumab is a recently developed monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor used to inhibit angiogenesis. The patient was ultimately treated with a nasal septal button with good symptom relief. This case documents the first report in the otolaryngology literature describing this new etiology for nasal septal perforations.

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