Keloid Banding Using Suture Ligature: A Novel Technique and Review of Literature

Authors

  • Dhavan A. Parikh MS,

    1. University of California, Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California, U.S.A.
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  • James M. Ridgway MD,

    1. Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, Irvine, California, U.S.A.
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  • Norman N. Ge MD

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, Irvine, California, U.S.A.
    • Norman Ge, MD, Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of California Irvine, 101 The City Drive Building, 56 Suite 500, Orange, CA 92868, U.S.A.
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Abstract

Introduction: Successful wound healing represents the coordinated response of cellular, cytokine, and growth factor mechanisms involved in tissue recovery. Disruptions in transforming growth factor-β signaling, senescence/apoptosis, keratinocyte-fibroblast interactions, and other regulatory cascades can lead to the production of hypertrophic scar or keloid tissue formation. Current clinical investigations support surgical excision, meticulous closure, postoperative steroid injections, and postprocedural pressure dressings in the treatment of keloid tissue formation. Unfortunately, a universal approach in keloid therapy has yet to be identified. Here we offer a novel banding technique using suture ligature for the removal of these tissues.

Methods: Using a suture ligature, keloid tissues were banded along their base for a 5-week period. Tissue evaluation and additional suture banding was performed on a weekly basis until complete mummification and spontaneous removal of ligated tissues. No additional pressure dressings were placed after tissue removal as treated sites had essentially undergone pressure therapy from the banding treatment.

Results: Keloid tissues from multiple sites of the head and neck were effectively removed without complication using the suture banding technique. During a follow-up period of 12 months, no evidence of keloid tissue recurrence was observed.

Conclusion: Keloid tissue formation remains a formidable challenge for the patient and physician alike. The application of a simple tissue banding technique holds promise in the direct and preventative treatment of keloid tissue formation whereas the end results merit further clinical and laboratory investigation.

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