Anti-topoisomerase I antibody levels as serum markers of skin sclerosis in systemic sclerosis

Authors

  • Minoru Hasegawa,

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Medical, Pharmaceutical and Health Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan
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    • These authors contributed equally to this study. Conflict of interest: none.
  • Sayako Imura-Kumada,

    1. Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Medical, Pharmaceutical and Health Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan
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    • These authors contributed equally to this study. Conflict of interest: none.
  • Takashi Matsushita,

    1. Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Medical, Pharmaceutical and Health Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan
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  • Yasuhito Hamaguchi,

    1. Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Medical, Pharmaceutical and Health Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan
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  • Manabu Fujimoto,

    1. Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Medical, Pharmaceutical and Health Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan
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  • Kazuhiko Takehara

    1. Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Medical, Pharmaceutical and Health Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan
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Correspondence: Minoru Hasegawa, M.D., Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Medical, Pharmaceutical and Health Sciences, Kanazawa University, 13-1 Takaramachi, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-8641, Japan. Email: minoruha@derma.m.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to clarify the clinical significance of anti-topoisomerase I antibody (Ab) levels in Japanese patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Using immunoprecipitation assays and enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA), anti-topoisomerase I Ab was detected in 53 SSc patients who visited Kanazawa University Hospital between 2001 and 2010. In these patients, the association between serum anti-topoisomerase I Ab levels measured with ELISA and clinical features were compared using univariate analysis and multiple regression analysis. There were significantly positive correlations between anti-topoisomerase I Ab levels and the modified Rodnan total skin thickness score (MRSS) and skin thickness progression rate, and a significantly negative correlation with disease duration. On the other hand, anti-topoisomerase I Ab levels were not significantly associated with other clinical features including lung involvement. In a longitudinal study, anti-topoisomerase I Ab levels were decreased significantly in patients that had decreased MRSS, but not in patients that had unchanged or increased MRSS. There was a significantly positive association between anti-topoisomerase I Ab levels and MRSS and a significantly negative association with disease duration by multiple regression analysis. Our findings suggest that serum levels of anti-topoisomerase I Ab reflect the severity of skin sclerosis in patients with SSc.

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