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Fig. S1. A. Examples for the accumulation of CH4, CO2 and δ13C in fresh lake sediments of white water (WW), black water (BW) and clear water (CW) rivers incubated under anoxic conditions in the absence and presence of CH3F; mean ± SE, n = 3. The data ranges used for calculations are indicated by arrows.

B. Examples for the accumulation of CH4, CO2 and δ13C in dry lake sediments of white water (WW), black water (BW) and clear water (CW) rivers incubated under anoxic conditions in the absence and presence of CH3F; mean ± SE, n = 3. The data ranges used for calculations are indicated by arrows.

Fig. S2. Values of δ13C of CO2, CH4 accumulated over the period indicated in Fig. S1, and corresponding values of αCO2,CH4 and δ13C of acetate-methyl accumulated until the end of incubation.

Fig. S3. Diversity index ACE calculated for total archaeal and bacterial sequences shown in Table S1. The ACE were calculated for each sediment and then averaged (±SE) for sediments from black water and clear water lakes.

Fig. S4. Diversity indices Chao and ACE calculated for 455 randomly selected bacterial sequences shown in Table S1. The indices were calculated for each sediment and then averaged (±SE) for sediments from black water and clear water lakes.

Table S1. Number of high-quality sequences and OTUs with 97% sequence identity of archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA genes in the different lake sediments in fresh, dried and rewetted/incubated state.

Table S2. Major characteristics of the lakes and the water chemistry.

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