Cost–benefit of infection control interventions targeting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in hospitals: systematic review

Authors

  • L. Farbman,

    Corresponding author
    1. Medicine E, Rabin Medical Centre, Beilinson Hospital, Petah-Tikva, Israel
    2. Leon Recanati Faculty of Management and Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel
    • Corresponding author: L. Farbman, Medicine E, Rabin Medical Centre, Beilinson Hospital, 39 Jabatinski road, Petab-Tikva, 49100, Israel

      E-mail: laurafarbman@gmail.com

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  • T. Avni,

    1. Medicine E, Rabin Medical Centre, Beilinson Hospital, Petah-Tikva, Israel
    2. Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel
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  • B. Rubinovitch,

    1. Unit of Infection Control, Rabin Medical Centre, Beilinson Hospital, Petah-Tikva, Israel
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  • L. Leibovici,

    1. Medicine E, Rabin Medical Centre, Beilinson Hospital, Petah-Tikva, Israel
    2. Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel
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  • M. Paul

    1. Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel
    2. Unit of Infectious Diseases, Beilinson Hospital, Petah-Tikva, Israel
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Abstract

Infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) incur significant costs. We aimed to examine the cost and cost–benefit of infection control interventions against MRSA and to examine factors affecting economic estimates. We performed a systematic review of studies assessing infection control interventions aimed at preventing spread of MRSA in hospitals and reporting intervention costs, savings, cost–benefit or cost-effectiveness. We searched PubMed and references of included studies with no language restrictions up to January 2012. We used the Quality of Health Economic Studies tool to assess study quality. We report cost and savings per month in 2011 US$. We calculated the median save/cost ratio and the save–cost difference with interquartile range (IQR) range. We examined the effects of MRSA endemicity, intervention duration and hospital size on results. Thirty-six studies published between 1987 and 2011 fulfilled inclusion criteria. Fifteen of the 18 studies reporting both costs and savings reported a save/cost ratio >1. The median save/cost ratio across all 18 studies was 7.16 (IQR 1.37–16). The median cost across all studies reporting intervention costs (n = 31) was 8648 (IQR 2025–19 170) US$ per month; median savings were 38 751 (IQR 14 206–75 842) US$ per month (23 studies). Higher save/cost ratios were observed in the intermediate to high endemicity setting compared with the low endemicity setting, in hospitals with <500-beds and with interventions of >6 months. Infection control intervention to reduce spread of MRSA in acute-care hospitals showed a favourable cost/benefit ratio. This was true also for high MRSA endemicity settings. Unresolved economic issues include rapid screening using molecular techniques and universal versus targeted screening.

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