How well can pelvic floor muscles with major defects contract? A cross-sectional comparative study 6 weeks after delivery using transperineal 3D/4D ultrasound and manometer

Authors

  • G Hilde,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway
    2. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway
    • Correspondence: G Hilde, Department of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, PO Box 4014, Ullevål Stadion, 0806 Oslo, Norway. Email gunvor.hilde@gmail.com

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  • J Stær-Jensen,

    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway
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  • F Siafarikas,

    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway
    2. Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
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  • K Gjestland,

    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway
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  • M Ellström Engh,

    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway
    2. Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
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  • K Bø

    1. Department of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway
    2. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway
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Abstract

Objective

To investigate ability to contract, vaginal resting pressure (VRP), pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength and PFM endurance 6 weeks after vaginal delivery in primiparous women, with and without major defects of the levator ani (LA) muscle.

Design

Cross-sectional comparative study.

Setting

Akershus University Hospital, Norway.

Sample

A cohort of 175 singleton primiparous women delivering vaginally after more than 32 weeks of gestation.

Methods

Major LA defects were assessed by 3D/4D transperineal ultrasound at maximal PFM contraction, using tomographic imaging. VRP, PFM strength and PFM endurance were measured vaginally by manometer. Data were analysed by independent-samples Student's t test, chi-square test, and standard multiple and simple linear regression.

Main outcome measures

VRP, PFM strength and PFM endurance.

Results

Of the women included in the study, 4% were not able to contract their PFM 6 weeks after delivery. Women with major LA defects (n = 55) had 47% lower PFM strength and 47% lower endurance when compared with women without major LA defects (n = 120). Mean differences were 7.5 cmH2O (95% CI 5.1–9.9, < 0.001) and 51.2 cmH2O seconds (95% CI 32.8–69.6, < 0.001), respectively. These estimates were unchanged by adjustment in multivariable linear regression for potentially confounding demographic and obstetric factors. No difference was found regarding VRP (= 0.670).

Conclusions

Women with major LA defects after vaginal delivery had pronounced lower PFM strength and endurance than women without such defects; however, most women with major LA defects were able to contract the PFM. This indicates a potential capacity by non-injured muscle fibres to compensate for loss in muscle strength, even at an early stage after delivery.

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