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Validation of Patient and Nurse Short Forms of the Readiness for Hospital Discharge Scale and Their Relationship to Return to the Hospital

Authors

  • Marianne E. Weiss,

    Corresponding author
    1. Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare, St. Joseph/Sister, Rosalie Klein Professor of Women's Health, Marquette University College of Nursing, Milwaukee, WI
    • Address correspondence to Marianne E. Weiss, D.N.Sc., R.N., Associate Professor and Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare, St. Joseph/Sister, Rosalie Klein Professor of Women's Health, Marquette University College of Nursing, Milwaukee, WI 53201-1881; e-mail: marianne.weiss@marquette.edu.

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  • Linda L. Costa,

    1. University of Maryland School of Nursing, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD
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  • Olga Yakusheva,

    1. Administration and Graduate School of Management, Department of Economics, Marquette University College of Business, Milwaukee, WI
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  • Kathleen L. Bobay

    1. Marquette University College of Nursing, Milwaukee, WI
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Abstract

Objective

To validate patient and nurse short forms for discharge readiness assessment and their associations with 30-day readmissions and emergency department (ED) visits.

Data Sources/Study Setting

A total of 254 adult medical-surgical patients and their discharging nurses from an Eastern US tertiary hospital between May and November, 2011.

Study Design

Prospective longitudinal design, multinomial logistic regression analysis.

Data Collection/Extraction Methods

Nurses and patients independently completed an eight-item Readiness for Hospital Discharge Scale on the day of discharge. Patient characteristics, readmissions, and ED visits were electronically abstracted.

Principal Findings

Nurse assessment of low discharge readiness was associated with a six- to nine-fold increase in readmission risk. Patient self-assessment was not associated with readmission; neither was associated with ED visits.

Conclusions

Nurse discharge readiness assessment should be added to existing strategies for identifying readmission risk.

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