Ming in the Zhuangzi Neipian: Enlightened Engagement

Authors

  • Karyn L. Lai,

    Corresponding author
    1. University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
    • KARYN L. LAI, Associate Professor, School of Humanities and Languages, University of New South Wales. Specialties: pre-Qin Chinese philosophy, comparative ethics, comparative epistemology. E-mail: k.lai@unsw.edu.au. WAI WAI CHIU, Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy, Lingnan University. Specialties: pre-Qin Chinese philosophy, Chinese intellectual history, comparative ethics. E-mail: w.chiu@unswalumni.com

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  • Wai Wai Chiu

    Corresponding author
    1. Lingnan University, Hong Kong, SAR, China
    • KARYN L. LAI, Associate Professor, School of Humanities and Languages, University of New South Wales. Specialties: pre-Qin Chinese philosophy, comparative ethics, comparative epistemology. E-mail: k.lai@unsw.edu.au. WAI WAI CHIU, Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy, Lingnan University. Specialties: pre-Qin Chinese philosophy, Chinese intellectual history, comparative ethics. E-mail: w.chiu@unswalumni.com

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Abstract

In this article, we present an account of ming 明 in the Zhuangzi's Neipian in light of the disagreements among the thinkers of the time. We suggest that ming is associated with the Daoist sage's vision: he sees through the debaters' attempts to win the debates. We propose that ming is primarily a meta-epistemological stance, that is, the sage understands the nature of the debates and does not enter the fray; therefore he does not share the thinkers' anxieties. The sage takes his stance at the pivot of dao (daoshu 道樞) and, from there, responds to the different views limitlessly.

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