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Published simultaneously in the Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health, 59(1).

The Joanna Briggs Institute: A Rich Resource for Practice Evidence

  1. Top of page
  2. The Joanna Briggs Institute: A Rich Resource for Practice Evidence
  3. From Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) Issues 8–9, 2013
  4. From Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE)
  5. Evidence-Based Reviews from Other Sources
  6. Biography

The Joanna Briggs Institute is an international nonprofit organization based at the University of Adelaide in South Australia with the goal of synthesizing, transferring, and utilizing the best evidence to improve health outcomes globally. Developed initially by nurses in 1996 and named for the first matron of the Royal Adelaide Hospital, the Joanna Briggs Institute now provides evidence for clinicians in nursing, medicine, and allied health worldwide.

The Joanna Briggs Institute comprises more than 80 affiliate and international collaborating centers that focus on systematic reviews of evidence. Several centers are located in the United States. A training program is available for individuals who are interested in writing systematic reviews for the Joanna Briggs Institute. A 6-month clinical fellowship program is also available. Although creating systematic reviews is important, the Joanna Briggs Institute continues the process by including tools to implement evidence and measure outcomes.

Fourteen subject areas or nodes are currently available for searching. Areas of most interest to readers of this journal include health management and assessment, midwifery, and mental health. Other topics of interest include general medicine and cancer care; a newborn area will be available soon. Within each subject area, seven types of publications are provided to enhance implementation of evidence into practice and to evaluate results. Types of publications include evidence-based practice recommendations, evidence summaries, best practice information sheets, systematic reviews, consumer information sheets, systematic review protocols, and technical reports. A number of tools have also been developed to help clinicians appraise evidence. These include tools for the review of an individual article, writing a systematic review, critical appraisal of qualitative research, and critical appraisal by a team. Tools to implement evidence and evaluate practice change are also available.

Although some information is available online at no cost, the majority of information is provided through institutional or individual memberships or subscriptions. The Joanna Briggs Institute database of published documents can be searched within the identified subject areas to bring evidence summaries and clinically focused information to clinicians at the point of care. For example, breastfeeding evidence can be found in the midwifery subject area. This rich information resource provides tools for researchers, faculty, students, and clinicians interested in utilizing the best available clinical evidence (Joanna Briggs Institute, 2013).

Joanna Briggs Institute. (2013). Welcome to the Joanna Briggs Institute. Retrieved from http://joannabriggs.org/

From Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) Issues 8–9, 2013

  1. Top of page
  2. The Joanna Briggs Institute: A Rich Resource for Practice Evidence
  3. From Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) Issues 8–9, 2013
  4. From Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE)
  5. Evidence-Based Reviews from Other Sources
  6. Biography

New Systematic Reviews in CDSR: Women's Health

  • Heparin for assisted reproduction
  • Natural cycle in vitro fertilization (IVF) for subfertile couples
  • Assisted reproductive technology: an overview of Cochrane reviews
  • Risk of ovarian cancer in women treated with ovarian-stimulating drugs for infertility
  • Antioxidants for female subfertility
  • Perioperative nutrition interventions for women with ovarian cancer

New Systematic Reviews in CDSR: Pregnancy and Birth

  • Relaxin for preventing preterm birth
  • Transabdominal amnioinfusion for improving fetal outcomes after oligohydramnios secondary to preterm prelabor rupture of membranes before 26 weeks
  • Secondary suturing compared to nonsuturing for broken-down perineal wounds following childbirth
  • Combined use of estrogen and progesterone for preventing miscarriage
  • Titrated oral misoprostol for augmenting labor to improve maternal and neonatal outcomes

Updated Systematic Reviews in CDSR: Women's Health

  • 20 microg versus > 20 microg estrogen combined oral contraceptives for contraception
  • Gonadotrophins for idiopathic male factor subfertility
  • Endometrial resection and ablation techniques for heavy menstrual bleeding
  • Theory-based interventions for contraception

Updated Systematic Reviews in CDSR: Pregnancy and Birth

  • Internal versus external tocodynamometry during induced or augmented labor.
  • Different corticosteroids and regimens for accelerating fetal lung maturation for women at risk of preterm birth
  • Maternal positions and mobility during first stage labor
  • Interventions for preventing and treating pelvic and back pain in pregnancy
  • Midwife-led continuity models versus other models of care for childbearing women
  • Restricting oral fluid and food intake during labor
  • Acupuncture for induction of labor
  • Early amniotomy and early oxytocin for prevention of, or therapy for, delay in first stage spontaneous labor compared with routine care
  • Caesarean section versus vaginal delivery for preterm birth in singletons
  • Package of care for active management in labor for reducing caesarean section rates in low-risk women

Updated Systematic Reviews in CDSR: Neonatal

  • Early light reduction for preventing retinopathy of prematurity in very low-birth-weight infants
  • Cycled light in the intensive care unit for preterm and low-birth-weight infants
  • Postnatal phenobarbital for the prevention of intraventricular hemorrhage in preterm infants
  • Newborn screening for homocystinuria
  • D-penicillamine for preventing retinopathy of prematurity in preterm infants

From Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE)

  1. Top of page
  2. The Joanna Briggs Institute: A Rich Resource for Practice Evidence
  3. From Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) Issues 8–9, 2013
  4. From Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE)
  5. Evidence-Based Reviews from Other Sources
  6. Biography

Recent Abstract Entries Assessing Quality of Systematic Reviews: Women's Health

  • Micronutrients food fortification and its impact on woman and child health: A systematic review
  • Primary care management of abnormal uterine bleeding
  • Triptans in prevention of menstrual migraine: A systematic review with meta-analysis
  • Dietary composition in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome: A systematic review to inform evidence-based guidelines
  • How does the number of oral contraceptive pill packs dispensed or prescribed affect continuation and other measures of consistent and correct use? A systematic review
  • Different combined oral contraceptives and the risk of venous thrombosis: Systematic review and network meta-analysis

Recent Abstract Entries Assessing Quality of Systematic Reviews: Neonatal

  • Predictive value of the Bayley scales of infant development on development of very preterm/very low-birth-weight children: a meta-analysis

Recent Abstract Entries Assessing Quality of Systematic Reviews: Clinical Practice

  • Midwives and supervisors of midwives’ perceptions of the statutory supervision of midwifery within the United Kingdom: a systematic review

Featured Review: Flemming, K., Graham, H., Heirs, M., Fox, D., & Sowden A. (2013). Smoking in pregnancy: a systematic review of qualitative research of women who commence pregnancy as smokers. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 69(5), 1023–1036.

In this systematic review, the researchers reported on the well-known adverse effects of cigarette smoking during pregnancy including increased risk of low-birth-weight, small-for-gestational-age newborns, and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Interventions have been developed to help women stop smoking during pregnancy, and those interventions have been effective in helping women stop smoking and lowering the risk of preterm birth and low birth weight. However, evidence of continued effects for ongoing smoking cessation beyond the early postpartum period has not been documented.

Some women may plan to simply quit smoking during pregnancy. However, the social contexts of women's lives, including the smoking status of partners and other household members, affect long-term smoking status. Authors of systematic reviews of smoking cessation interventions have rarely addressed these social influences. Therefore, the purpose of this review of qualitative research was to address the social context surrounding women's efforts to quit smoking during pregnancy.

The authors searched multiple bibliographic databases, identified 5,888 potential studies, and selected 29 articles (representing 26 studies) for inclusion in the review. The studies included 640 women who smoked prior to pregnancy. The review was based on a metaethnographic approach. The authors read the studies to understand their contexts then determined relationships between studies by comparing key findings from each. They established similarities and differences, synthesized a reduced account, and developed a final synthesis of the overall study results.

Four “lines of agreement” were derived to describe the experiences of women who smoked at the onset of pregnancy. Being a smoker represented an established habit and a way for women to relieve stress. Being a pregnant smoker represented tension between identity as a smoker and guilt about smoking while pregnant, including social disapproval. Quitting and trying to quit smoking represented the guilt of smoking while pregnant and the difficulty of trying to quit while a partner smokes. Finally, continuing to smoke represented reasons women continued to smoke during pregnancy and was similar to the context in which they initially became smokers.

Comment: The authors observed consistency of study findings over time and across different countries related to social disadvantage, the variability of the smoking, support behavior of partners, and stressors in women's lives. This information may be helpful to clinicians by demonstrating the intricacies of smoking identity and a partner who smokes while the woman tries to quit and the difference between efforts to quit during pregnancy versus long term.

Featured Review: Choi, J., Fukuoka, Y., & Lee, J. H. (2013). The effects of physical activity and physical activity plus diet interventions on body weight in overweight or obese women who are pregnant or in postpartum: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Preventive Medicine, 56(6), 351–364.

Approximately one third of women enter pregnancy overweight or obese, and women who are overweight are more likely than those of normal weight to gain more than the recommended amount during pregnancy. In addition to being associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, excessive weight gain and weight retention are associated with long-term obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to examine the effectiveness of physical activity and physical activity plus diet interventions specifically for women who were overweight or obese during pregnancy or during the postpartum period.

Following an extensive search resulting in 681 articles, the authors included 11 randomized controlled trials in the review: seven studies of overweight or obese pregnant women and four studies of overweight or obese postpartum women. Methodological quality varied across the studies with sample sizes ranging from 12 to 450. Authors of only four of the pregnancy studies and none of the postpartum studies reported the allocation concealment method for randomization. Intention-to-treat analysis was used in three pregnancy studies and one postpartum study. Intensity and duration of physical activity varied across the studies.

The seven pregnancy trials included 721 women and were conducted in developed countries. Investigators examined a variety of supervised physical activity programs alone, physical activity with dietary counseling early in the study or at intervals throughout pregnancy, or counseling on physical activity and diet without supervised physical activity. The results showed a significantly different gestational weight gain of .91 kg less for women in physical activity or physical activity and diet interventions than control groups. The difference in weight gain for the intervention groups was greater for studies of supervised physical activity plus diet (1.17 kg less gain) than control groups. Weight gain for women receiving unsupervised physical activity was not significantly different compared to women in the control groups.

A total of 547 women participated in the four postpartum trials: three conducted in the United States and one in the United Kingdom. All included physical activity and diet counseling, with variation in the specific physical activity and diet components. The timing of study initiation during the postpartum period varied from 4 weeks to 18 months. The meta-analysis results showed a significantly greater weight loss of 1.22 kg in the intervention groups compared to the control groups. Again, weight loss was greater in the subgroup receiving supervised physical activity plus diet (−1.50 kg) compared to unsupervised physical activity. Weight loss difference for women in unsupervised physical activity groups compared to women in the control groups was not statistically significant.

Comment: The authors found that interventions of physical activity (PA) with or without a dietary component for overweight or obese women were effective in reducing gestational weight gain or increasing weight loss postpartum; interventions that included supervised PA and diet were more effective. Clinicians considering implementing PA programs may find this meta-analysis helpful in selecting the most effective intervention components. Future researchers may include longer term outcomes and examine strategies for long-term weight loss maintenance for postpartum programs.

Evidence-Based Reviews from Other Sources

  1. Top of page
  2. The Joanna Briggs Institute: A Rich Resource for Practice Evidence
  3. From Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) Issues 8–9, 2013
  4. From Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE)
  5. Evidence-Based Reviews from Other Sources
  6. Biography

Recent Evidence-Based Reviews: Women's Health

  • Aggarwal, A., Pandurangi, A., & Smith, W. (2013). Disparities in breast and cervical cancer screening in women with mental illness: A systematic literature review. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 44(4), 392–398.
  • American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. (2013). ACOG practice bulletin no. 135: Second-trimester abortion. Obstetrics & Gynecology, 121(6), 1394–1406.
  • Auersperg, N. (2013). Ovarian surface epithelium as a source of ovarian cancers: Unwarranted speculation or evidence-based hypothesis? Gynecologic Oncology, 130(1), 246–251.
  • Bo, K., & Hilde, G. (2013). Does it work in the long term? A systematic review on pelvic floor muscle training for female stress urinary incontinence. Neurourology & Urodynamics, 32(3), 215–223.
  • Cachay, E. R., & Mathews, W. C. (2013). Human papillomavirus, anal cancer, and screening considerations among HIV-infected individuals. AIDS Reviews, 15(2), 122–133.
  • Carter, J., Stabile, C., Gunn, A., & Sonoda, Y. (2013). The physical consequences of gynecologic cancer surgery and their impact on sexual, emotional, and quality of life issues. Journal of Sexual Medicine, 10(Suppl 1), 21–34.
  • Chang, X., & Wu, J. (2013). Effects of luteal estradiol pre-treatment on the outcome of IVF in poor ovarian responders. Gynecological Endocrinology, 29(3), 196–200.
  • Dahl, L., Wittrup, I., Vaeggemose, U., Petersen, L. K., & Blaakaer, J. (2013). Life after gynecologic cancer – a review of patients’ quality of life, needs, and preferences in regard to follow-up. International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, 23(2), 227–234.
  • Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2013). U.S. selected practice recommendations for contraceptive use, 2013: Adapted from the World Health Organization selected practice recommendations for contraceptive use, 2nd edition. Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report, 62(RR-05), 1–60.
  • Havrilesky, L. J., Moorman, P. G., Lowery, W. J., Gierisch, J. M., Coeytaux, R. R., Urrutia, R. P., … Myers, E. R. (2013). Oral contraceptive pills as primary prevention for ovarian cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Obstetrics & Gynecology, 122(1), 139–147.
  • Horowitz, N. A., Benyamini, N., Wohlfart, K., Brenner, B., & Avivi, I. (2013). Reproductive organ involvement in non-Hodgkin lymphoma during pregnancy: A systematic review. Lancet Oncology, 14(7), e275-e282.
  • Indraccolo, U., Di Iorio, R., Matteo, M., Corona, G., Greco, P., & Indraccolo, S. R. (2013). The pathogenesis of endometrial polyps: A systematic semi-quantitative review. European Journal of Gynaecological Oncology, 34(1), 5–22.
  • Jaccard, J., & Levitz, N. (2013). Counseling adolescents about contraception: Towards the development of an evidence-based protocol for contraceptive counselors. Journal of Adolescent Health, 52(4 Suppl), S6–S13.
  • Kamdar, B. B., Tergas, A. I., Mateen, F. J., Bhayani, N. H., & Oh, J. (2013). Night-shift work and risk of breast cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Breast Cancer Research & Treatment, 138(1), 291–301.
  • Kerns, J., & Steinauer, J. (2013). Management of postabortion hemorrhage. Contraception, 87(3), 331–342.
  • Krause, J., Subklew-Sehume, F., Kenyon, C., & Colebunders, R. (2013). Acceptability of HIV self-testing: A systematic literature review. BMC Public Health, 13, 735.
  • Krychman, M., & Millheiser, L. S. (2013). Sexual health issues in women with cancer. Journal of Sexual Medicine, 10(Suppl 1), 5–15.
  • Lee, J. Y., Jeon, I., Kim, J. W., Song, Y. S., Yoon, J. M., & Park, S. M. (2013). Diabetes mellitus and ovarian cancer risk: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, 23(3), 402–412.
  • Lissouba, P., Van de Perre, P., & Auvert, B. (2013). Association of genital human papillomavirus infection with HIV acquisition: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Sexually Transmitted Infections, 89(5), 350–356.
  • Lu, M., Moritz, S., Lorenzetti, D., Sykes, L., Straus, S., & Quan, H. (2012). A systematic review of interventions to increase breast and cervical cancer screening uptake among Asian women. BMC Public Health, 12, 413.
  • Marmot, M. G., Altman, D. G., Cameron, D. A., Dewar, J. A., Thompson, S. G., & Wilcox, M. (2013). The benefits and harms of breast cancer screening: An independent review. British Journal of Cancer, 108(11), 2205–2240.
  • Massad, L. S., Einstein, M. H., Huh, W. K., Katki, H. A., Kinney, W. K., Schiffman, M., … Lawson, H. W. (2013). 2012 updated consensus guidelines for the management of abnormal cervical cancer screening tests and cancer precursors. Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease, 17(5 Suppl 1), S1–S27.
  • Moyer, V. A., U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. (2013). Screening for HIV: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. Annals of Internal Medicine, 159(1), 51–60.
  • Nagle, C. M., Olsen, C. M., Ibiebele, T. I., Spurdle, A. B., & Webb, P. M. (2013). Glycemic index, glycemic load and endometrial cancer risk: Results from the Australian national endometrial cancer study and an updated systematic review and meta-analysis. European Journal of Nutrition, 52(2), 705–715.
  • Nahuis, M. J., Oosterhuis, G. J., Hompes, P. G., van Wely, M., Mol, B. W., & van der Veen, F. (2013). The basic fertility workup in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: A systematic review. Fertility & Sterility, 100(1), 219–225.
  • Nassif, J., Mattar, S., Abu Musa, A., & Eid, A. (2013). Endometriosis and cancer: What do we know? Minerva Ginecologica, 65(2), 167–179.
  • Ni, X., Ma, J., Zhao, Y., Wang, Y., & Wang, S. (2013). Meta-analysis on the association between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and ovarian cancer. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 75(1), 26–35.
  • Patel, H., Wagner, M., Singhal, P., & Kothari, S. (2013). Systematic review of the incidence and prevalence of genital warts. BMC Infectious Diseases, 13, 39.
  • Perry, J. R., Corre, T., Esko, T., Chasman, D. I., Fischer, K., Franceschini, N., … Murray, A. (2013). A genome-wide association study of early menopause and the combined impact of identified variants. Human Molecular Genetics, 22(7), 1465–1472.
  • Qu, X., Zhang, X., Qin, A., Liu, G., Zhai, Z., Hao, Y., … Dai, K. (2013). Bone mineral density and risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Breast Cancer Research & Treatment, 138(1), 261–271.
  • Reynolds, P. (2013). Smoking and breast cancer. Journal of Mammary Gland Biology & Neoplasia, 18(1), 15–23.
  • Robert, M., Schulz, J. A., Harvey, M. A., Lovatsis, D., Walter, J. E., Chou, Q., … Wilkie, D. H. (2013). Technical update on pessary use. Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology Canada, 35(7), 664–674.
  • Rosa, M. I., Silva, G. D., de Azedo Simoes, P. W., Souza, M. V., Panatto, A. P., Simon, C. S., … Medeiros, L. R. (2013). The prevalence of human papillomavirus in ovarian cancer: A systematic review. International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, 23(3), 437–441.
  • Shaw, K. A., Topp, N. J., Shaw, J. G., & Blumenthal, P. D. (2013). Mifepristone-misoprostol dosing interval and effect on induction abortion times: A systematic review. Obstetrics & Gynecology, 121(6), 1335–1347.
  • Spark, L. C., Reeves, M. M., Fjeldsoe, B. S., & Eakin, E. G. (2013). Physical activity and/or dietary interventions in breast cancer survivors: A systematic review of the maintenance of outcomes. Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 7(1), 74–82.
  • Stockman, J. K., Lucea, M. B., & Campbell, J. C. (2013). Forced sexual initiation, sexual intimate partner violence and HIV risk in women: A global review of the literature. AIDS & Behavior, 17(3), 832–847.
  • Thomopoulos, C., Tsioufis, C., Michalopoulou, H., Makris, T., Papademetriou, V., & Stefanadis, C. (2013). Assisted reproductive technology and pregnancy-related hypertensive complications: A systematic review. Journal of Human Hypertension, 27(3), 148–157.
  • Tomljenovic, L., Spinosa, J. P., & Shaw, C. A. (2013). Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines as an option for preventing cervical malignancies: (How) effective and safe? Current Pharmaceutical Design, 19(8), 1466–1487.
  • Zhang, Z. H., Su, P. Y., Hao, J. H., & Sun, Y. H. (2013). The role of preexisting diabetes mellitus on incidence and mortality of endometrial cancer: A meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, 23(2), 294–303.
  • Zheng, J. S., Hu, X. J., Zhao, Y. M., Yang, J., & Li, D. (2013). Intake of fish and marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and risk of breast cancer: Meta-analysis of data from 21 independent prospective cohort studies. BMJ, 346, f3706.

Recent Evidence-based Reviews: Pregnancy and Birth

  • Al-Mandeel, H., Alhindi, M. Y., & Sauve, R. (2013). Effects of intentional delivery on maternal and neonatal outcomes in pregnancies with preterm prelabour rupture of membranes between 28 and 34 weeks of gestation: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Maternal-Fetal & Neonatal Medicine, 26(1), 83–89.
  • Austin, M. P., Middleton, P., Reilly, N. M., & Highet, N. J. (2013). Detection and management of mood disorders in the maternity setting: The Australian clinical practice guidelines. Women & Birth: Journal of the Australian College of Midwives, 26(1), 2–9.
  • Brown, M. C., Best, K. E., Pearce, M. S., Waugh, J., Robson, S. C., & Bell, R. (2013). Cardiovascular disease risk in women with pre-eclampsia: Systematic review and meta-analysis. European Journal of Epidemiology, 28(1), 1–19.
  • Danon, D., Sekar, R., Hack, K. E., & Fisk, N. M. (2013). Increased stillbirth in uncomplicated monochorionic twin pregnancies: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Obstetrics & Gynecology, 121(6), 1318–1326.
  • Delahaije, D. H., Dirksen, C. D., Peeters, L. L., & Smits, L. J. (2013). Anxiety and depression following preeclampsia or hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome. A systematic review. Acta Obstetricia Et Gynecologica Scandinavica, 92(7), 746–761.
  • Ferguson, S., Davis, D., & Browne, J. (2013). Does antenatal education affect labour and birth? A structured review of the literature. Women & Birth: Journal of the Australian College of Midwives, 26(1), e5–e8.
  • Galazis, N., Docheva, N., Nicolaides, K. H., & Atiomo, W. (2013). Proteomic biomarkers of preterm birth risk in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS): A systematic review and biomarker database integration. PLoS ONE, 8(1), e53801.
  • Galvao, T. F., Silva, M. T., Serruya, S. J., Newman, L. M., Klausner, J. D., Pereira, M. G., & Fescina, R. (2013). Safety of benzathine penicillin for preventing congenital syphilis: A systematic review. PLoS ONE, 8(2), e56463.
  • Haider, B. A., Olofin, I., Wang, M., Spiegelman, D., Ezzati, M., & Fawzi, W. W. (2013). Anaemia, prenatal iron use, and risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes: Systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ, 346, f3443.
  • Hawkes, S. J., Gomez, G. B., & Broutet, N. (2013). Early antenatal care: Does it make a difference to outcomes of pregnancy associated with syphilis? A systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS ONE, 8(2), e56713.
  • Hirani, S. A., & Karmaliani, R. (2013). Evidence based workplace interventions to promote breastfeeding practices among Pakistani working mothers. Women & Birth: Journal of the Australian College of Midwives, 26(1), 10–16.
  • James, L., Brody, D., & Hamilton, Z. (2013). Risk factors for domestic violence during pregnancy: A meta-analytic review. Violence & Victims, 28(3), 359–380.
  • Jido, T. A., & Yakasai, I. A. (2013). Preeclampsia: A review of the evidence. Annals of African Medicine, 12(2), 75–85.
  • Krug, I., Taborelli, E., Sallis, H., Treasure, J., & Micali, N. (2013). A systematic review of obstetric complications as risk factors for eating disorder and a meta-analysis of delivery method and prematurity. Physiology & Behavior, 109, 51–62.
  • Lathrop, B. (2013). A systematic review comparing group prenatal care to traditional prenatal care. Nursing for Women's Health, 17(2), 118–130.
  • Lee, L. J., & Lupo, P. J. (2013). Maternal smoking during pregnancy and the risk of congenital heart defects in offspring: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Pediatric Cardiology, 34(2), 398–407.
  • Lobo, T. F., Torloni, M. R., Gueuvoghlanian-Silva, B. Y., Mattar, R., & Daher, S. (2013). Resistin concentration and gestational diabetes: A systematic review of the literature. Journal of Reproductive Immunology, 97(1), 120–127.
  • Romualdi, E., Dentali, F., Rancan, E., Squizzato, A., Steidl, L., Middeldorp, S., & Ageno, W. (2013). Anticoagulant therapy for venous thromboembolism during pregnancy: A systematic review and a meta-analysis of the literature. Journal of Thrombosis & Haemostasis, 11(2), 270–281.
  • Solnes Miltenburg, A., Roggeveen, Y., van Elteren, M., Shields, L., Bunders, J., van Roosmalen, J., & Stekelenburg, J. (2013). A protocol for a systematic review of birth preparedness and complication readiness programs. Systems Review, 2, 11.
  • Thomopoulos, C., Tsioufis, C., Michalopoulou, H., Makris, T., Papademetriou, V., & Stefanadis, C. (2013). Assisted reproductive technology and pregnancy-related hypertensive complications: A systematic review. Journal of Human Hypertension, 27(3), 148–157.
  • Zhou, F., Hao, Y. F., Chen, Y., & Wang, T. (2013). Chinese herbal medicine in treatment of polyhydramnios: A meta-analysis and systematic review. Chinese Medical Sciences Journal, 28(2), 72–81.

Recent Evidence-Based Reviews: Neonatal

  • Askie, L. M. (2013). Optimal oxygen saturations in preterm infants: A moving target. Current Opinion in Pediatrics, 25(2), 188–192.
  • Barone, G., Maggio, L., Saracino, A., Perri, A., Romagnoli, C., & Zecca, E. (2013). How to feed small for gestational age newborns. Italian Journal of Pediatrics, 39, 28.
  • Benzies, K. M., Magill-Evans, J. E., Hayden, K. A., & Ballantyne, M. (2013). Key components of early intervention programs for preterm infants and their parents: A systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Pregnancy & Childbirth, 13(Suppl 1), S10.
  • Boshari, T., Urquia, M. L., Sgro, M., De Souza, L. R., & Ray, J. G. (2013). Differences in birthweight curves between newborns of immigrant mothers vs. infants born in their corresponding native countries: Systematic overview. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, 27(2), 118–130.
  • Lanzieri, T. M., Dollard, S. C., Josephson, C. D., Schmid, D. S., & Bialek, S. R. (2013). Breast milk-acquired cytomegalovirus infection and disease in VLBW and premature infants. Pediatrics, 131(6), e1937–e1945.
  • Van Onselen, J. (2013). Skin care for infants: An evidence-based review. Journal of Family Health Care, 23(3), 29–30.
  • van Vliet, E. O., de Kieviet, J. F., Oosterlaan, J., & van Elburg, R. M. (2013). Perinatal infections and neurodevelopmental outcome in very preterm and very low-birth-weight infants: A meta-analysis. JAMA Pediatrics, 167(7), 662–668.

Biography

  1. Top of page
  2. The Joanna Briggs Institute: A Rich Resource for Practice Evidence
  3. From Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) Issues 8–9, 2013
  4. From Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE)
  5. Evidence-Based Reviews from Other Sources
  6. Biography
  • Melissa D. Avery, PhD, CNM, FACNM, FAAN, is a professor and chair of the Child and Family Health Co-operative, University of Minnesota, School of Nursing, Minneapolis, MN.