An overview of the metabolic differences between Bradyrhizobium japonicum 110 bacteria and differentiated bacteroids from soybean (Glycine max) root nodules: an in vitro 13C- and 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

Authors

  • Pierre Vauclare,

    Corresponding author
    1. Extremophiles and Large Macromolecular Assemblies (ELMA) group, Institut de Biologie Structurale J.-P. Ebel, UMR 5075 CEA-CNRS-UJF-PSB, Grenoble Cedex, France
    • Département de Biologie Moléculaire Végétale (DBMV), Bâtiment Biophore, Lausanne, Switzerland
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  • Richard Bligny,

    1. Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire Végétale, Unité Mixte de Recherche 5168, Institut de Recherche en Technologie et Sciences pour le Vivant, CEA, Grenoble cedex 9, France
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  • Elisabeth Gout,

    1. Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire Végétale, Unité Mixte de Recherche 5168, Institut de Recherche en Technologie et Sciences pour le Vivant, CEA, Grenoble cedex 9, France
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  • François Widmer

    1. Département de Biologie Moléculaire Végétale (DBMV), Bâtiment Biophore, Lausanne, Switzerland
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Correspondence: Pierre Vauclare, Extremophiles and Large Macromolecular Assemblies (ELMA) group, Institut de Biologie Structurale J.-P. Ebel, UMR 5075 CEA-CNRS-UJF-PSB, 41, Rue Jules Horowitz, 38027 Grenoble Cedex 1, France. Tel.: +33 438789569; fax: +33 438785494; e-mail: pierre.vauclare@ibs.fr

Abstract

Bradyrhizobium japonicum is a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria that induce root nodules formation in legume soybean (Glycine max.). Using 13C- and 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we have analysed the metabolite profiles of cultivated B. japonicum cells and bacteroids isolated from soybean nodules. Our results revealed some quantitative and qualitative differences between the metabolite profiles of bacteroids and their vegetative state. This includes in bacteroids a huge accumulation of soluble carbohydrates such as trehalose, glutamate, myo-inositol and homospermidine as well as Pi, nucleotide pools and intermediates of the primary carbon metabolism. Using this novel approach, these data show that most of the compounds detected in bacteroids reflect the metabolic adaptation of rhizobia to the surrounding microenvironment with its host plant cells.

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