Identification of regulated genes conferring resistance to high concentrations of glyphosate in a new strain of Enterobacter

Authors

  • Yun-Yan Fei,

    1. Soybean Research Institute/National Center for Soybean, Improvement/National Key Laboratory for Crop Genetics and Germplasm Enhancement, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China
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  • Jun-Yi Gai,

    1. Soybean Research Institute/National Center for Soybean, Improvement/National Key Laboratory for Crop Genetics and Germplasm Enhancement, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China
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  • Tuan-Jie Zhao

    Corresponding author
    1. Soybean Research Institute/National Center for Soybean, Improvement/National Key Laboratory for Crop Genetics and Germplasm Enhancement, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China
    • Correspondence: Tuan-Jie Zhao, Soybean Research Institute, Nanjing Agricultural University, Weigang 1 Hao, Xuanwu District, Nanjing 210095, Jiangsu Province, China.

      Tel.: + 86 25 84399531;

      fax: + 86 25 84395331;

      e-mail: tjzhao@njau.edu.cn

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Abstract

Glyphosate is a widely used herbicide that inhibits 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) activity. Most plants and microbes are sensitive to glyphosate. However, transgenic-resistant crops that contain a modified epsps obtained from the resistant microbes have been commercially successful and therefore, new resistance genes and their adaptive regulatory mechanisms are of great interest. In this study, a soil-borne, glyphosate-resistant bacterium was selected and identified as Enterobacter. The EPSPS in this strain was found to have been altered to a resistant one. A total of 42 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the glyphosate were screened using microarray techniques. Under treatment, argF, sdhA, ivbL, rrfA-H were downregulated, whereas the transcripts of speA, osmY, pflB, ahpC, fusA, deoA, uxaC, rpoD and a few ribosomal protein genes were upregulated. Data were verified by quantitative real-time PCR on selected genes. All transcriptional changes appeared to protect the bacteria from glyphosate and associated osmotic, acidic and oxidative stresses. Many DEGs may have the potential to confer resistance to glyphosate alone, and some may be closely related to the shikimate pathway, reflecting the complex gene interaction network for glyphosate resistance.

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