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Family nurse practitioner student perception of journal abstract usefulness in clinical decision making: A randomized controlled trial

Authors

  • Heather L. Johnson Lt. Col., USAF, DNP, FNP-BC, FAANP,

    (Assistant Professor), Corresponding author
    1. Graduate School of Nursing, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland
    • Correspondence

      Heather L. Johnson, Lt. Col., USAF, DNP, FNP-BC, FAANP, Graduate School of Nursing, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814.

      Tel: 301-295-1089;

      Fax: 301-295-1707;

      E-mail: heather.johnson@usuhs.edu

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  • Paul Fontelo MD, MPH,

    (Staff Scientist)
    1. Lister Hill Center for Biomedical Communications, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Cara H. Olsen DrPH,

    (Assistant Research Professor)
    1. Preventive Medicine & Biometrics Department, Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • MAJ Kenneth D. Jones II USA, PhD, MBA, MS,

    (Assistant Professor)
    1. Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Ronald W. Gimbel PhD

    (Assistant Professor)
    1. Biomedical Informatics Department, Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Disclaimer

  • This work is supported by USUHS Protocol #R02930.2. The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private ones of the authors and are not to be construed as official or reflecting the views of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, the U.S. Department of Defense, the National Library of Medicine, or the National Institutes of Health.

Abstract

Purpose

To assess family nurse practitioner (FNP) student perception of research abstract usefulness in clinical decision making.

Data sources

A randomized controlled trial conducted in a simulated environment with graduate FNP students of the Graduate School of Nursing, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. Given a clinical case study and modified MEDLINE search tool accessible via an iPad device, participants were asked to develop a treatment plan and complete a data collection form. The primary measure was perceived usefulness of the research abstracts in clinical decision making regarding a simulated obese patient seeking to prevent type 2 diabetes. Secondary measures related to participant demographics and accessibility and usefulness of full-text manuscripts.

Conclusions

The majority of NP students identified readily available research abstracts as useful in shaping their clinical decision making. The presence or absence of full-text manuscripts associated with the abstracts did not appear to influence the perceived abstract usefulness. The majority of students with full-text manuscript access in the timed simulated clinical encounter read at least one paper, but cited insufficient time to read full-text as a constraint.

Implications for practice

Research abstracts at point of care may be valuable to FNPs if easily accessible and integrated into clinical workflow.

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