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Nutritional status and quality of life in a cohort of Australian home parenteral nutrition patients: A pilot study

Authors

  • Emma Schliefert,

    1. Clinical Nutrition Unit, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
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    • E. Schliefert, BSc, Master of Nutrition and Dietetics Student
  • Sharon Carey

    Corresponding author
    1. Clinical Nutrition Unit, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    2. Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    • Correspondence: S. Carey, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Missenden Road, Camperdown, Sydney, NSW 2050, Australia. Email: slamb8@bigpond.com

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    • S. Carey, MND, Clinical Dietitian (APD)

Abstract

Aim

Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) impacts on nutritional status and subsequent quality of life. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the nutritional status and quality of life in a cohort of patients receiving home parenteral nutrition in a tertiary referral hospital, and the relationship between these two outcome measures.

Methods

Outpatients attending an intestinal failure clinic were recruited. Nutritional assessment included anthropometrics, Subjective Global Assessment and total dietary intake. Self-administered symptom and quality of life questionnaires were administered. Nutritional status, quality of life and the association between the two measures were statistically analysed.

Results

Subjective Global Assessment, body mass index, overall energy and protein intake indicated adequate nourishment. Clear gender differences were seen when assessing weight gain while on home parenteral nutrition. Males gained 15% body weight since commencement of HPN, while females lost −4%. Median female triceps skinfold and male mid-arm muscle circumference were below the 10th percentile, and grip strength was 50% of the predicted value. Quality of life was low compared with Australian norm values. Higher grip strength was associated with higher quality of life (P < 0.05).

Conclusions

Males on HPN are gaining weight on treatment while females are not. All have lower muscle mass, muscle strength and quality of life measures compared with the normal population. Current international clinical practice guidelines do not include exercise or rehabilitative recommendations that could potentially enhance patients' physical function and overall quality of life.

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