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The community structures of the coniferous and deciduous dead wood-dwelling arthropods in Korea

Authors

  • Hyun Jung Kim,

    1. Department of Biology, The Graduate School of Seoul Women's University, Seoul, Korea
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  • Jong Woo Nam,

    1. Department of Biology, The Graduate School of Seoul Women's University, Seoul, Korea
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  • Hoonbok Yi

    Corresponding authorCurrent affiliation:
    1. #402 The First Science Building, Department of Bio & Environmental technology, Seoul Women's University, Seoul, Korea
    • Department of Biology, The Graduate School of Seoul Women's University, Seoul, Korea
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Correspondence

Hoonbok Yi, Department of Biology, The Graduate School of Seoul Women's University, Seoul 139-774, Korea. Email: yih@swu.ac.kr

Abstract

We examined the structure of the arthropod community among deciduous and coniferous dead woods along the process of wood decay. We collected dead wood-dwelling arthropods from April 2010 to October 2011 by using a vacuum aspirator and an electric chain saw in three areas (Mt. Woonak, Mt. Wolchul, Mt. Jingang) in Korea. We identified them to species levels and classified them into functional groups. We collected 8792 arthropods (5 classes, 20 orders, 58 families, and 93 species). The species richness and abundance of arthropods increased with the progress of decay in dead woods. The evenness index seemed to be shown at a lower value at late decay stage than at early- and mid-decay stages. The diversity index (H′) in conifers was lower than that in deciduous dead woods at the early decay stage but this situation was reversed at the late decay stage. Arthropod communities of functional groups, except the xylophagous insects, did not differ in the variables, but the proportion of xylophagous insects increased as the decay stages progressed. The abundance of arthropods and xylophagous was statistically significantly different. The patterns generated by non-metric multidimensional scaling in the overall arthropod community composition revealed that the species composition between study areas were significantly different. We confirmed that dead woods play very important roles as arthropods' habitats. Thus, we suggest that the role of dead woods should be emphasized in the management of forest ecosystems.

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