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Effect of Cover Brine Type on the Quality of Meat from Herring Marinades

Authors

  • Mariusz Szymczak,

    Corresponding author
    1. Dept. of Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Food Science and Fisheries, West Pomeranian Univ. of Technology, Szczecin, Poland
    • Dept. of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Food Science and Fisheries, West Pomeranian Univ. of Technology, Szczecin, Poland
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  • Barbara Szymczak,

    1. Dept. of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Food Science and Fisheries, West Pomeranian Univ. of Technology, Szczecin, Poland
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  • Anna Koronkiewicz,

    1. Dept. of Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Food Science and Fisheries, West Pomeranian Univ. of Technology, Szczecin, Poland
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  • Katarzyna Felisiak,

    1. Dept. of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Food Science and Fisheries, West Pomeranian Univ. of Technology, Szczecin, Poland
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  • Mateusz Bednarek

    1. Fish Technology and Enzymology Students Scientific Assoc., Faculty of Food Science and Fisheries, West Pomeranian Univ. of Technology, Szczecin, Poland
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Direct inquiries to author Szymczak (E-mail: mariusz.szymczak@zut.edu.pl).

Abstract

Effects of vinegar, oil, and sour cream brines on meat quality of 4 popular cold marinades from herring were investigated in the study. Cover brine type affected the composition and nutritive value of meat as well as the sensory and microbiological quality of marinated herring. Qualitative differences resulted from cover brine penetration into meat, and from diffusion of components from meat to vinegar brine. Compared to oil and sour cream, vinegar brine contributed to increased concentrations of salt and acetic acid, hardness, color brightness of marinades meat and to increased microbial contamination of meat. Furthermore, vinegar caused nitrogen losses to 15%, including valuable products of protein hydrolysis, enzymes, and total volatile bases. The rolling up of fillets reduced diffusion even by 50%. In turn, oil and sour cream were causing mainly a higher fat content and overall sensory evaluation of the marinades.

Practical Application

Achieved results may be helpful to producers in adjusting raw material and semi-marinades to cover brine type. Conscious selection of cover brine type may improve product's quality or mask defects noticed in marinated herring.

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