Effects of Sulfhydryl Compounds, Carbohydrates, Organic Acids, and Sodium Sulfite on the Formation of Lysinoalanine in Preserved Egg

Authors

  • Xu-ying Luo,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang Univ, Nanchang, China
    2. Engineering Research Center of Biomass Conversion, Ministry of Education, Nanchang Univ, Nanchang, China
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  • Yong-gang Tu,

    Corresponding author
    1. College of Food Science and Engineering, Jiangxi Agricultural Univ, Nanchang, China
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  • Yan Zhao,

    Corresponding author
    1. State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang Univ, Nanchang, China
    2. Engineering Research Center of Biomass Conversion, Ministry of Education, Nanchang Univ, Nanchang, China
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  • Jian-ke Li,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang Univ, Nanchang, China
    2. Engineering Research Center of Biomass Conversion, Ministry of Education, Nanchang Univ, Nanchang, China
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  • Jun-jie Wang

    1. State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang Univ, Nanchang, China
    2. Engineering Research Center of Biomass Conversion, Ministry of Education, Nanchang Univ, Nanchang, China
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Abstract

To identify inhibitors for lysinoalanine formation in preserved egg, sulfhydryl compounds (glutathione, L-cysteine), carbohydrates (sucrose, D-glucose, maltose), organic acids (L-ascorbic acid, citric acid, DL-malic acid, lactic acid), and sodium sulfite were individually added at different concentrations to a pickling solution to prepare preserved eggs. Lysinoalanine formation as an index of these 10 substances was determined. Results indicate that glutathione, D-glucose, maltose, L-ascorbic acid, citric acid, lactic acid, and sodium sulfite all effectively diminished lysinoalanine formation in preserved egg albumen and yolk. When 40 and 80 mmol/L of sodium sulfite, citric acid, L-ascorbic acid, and D-glucose were individually added into the pickling solution, the inhibition rates of lysinoalanine in the produced preserved egg albumen and yolk were higher. However, the attempt of minimizing lysinoalanine formation was combined with the premise of ensuring preserved eggs quality. Moreover, the addition of 40 and 80 mmol/L of sodium sulfite, 40 and 80 mmol/L of D-glucose, 40 mmol/L of citric acid, and 40 mmol/L of L-ascorbic acid was optimal to produce preserved eggs. The corresponding inhibition rates of lysinoalanine in the albumen were approximately 76.3% to 76.5%, 67.6% to 67.8%, 74.6%, and 74.6%, and the corresponding inhibition rates of lysinoalanine in the yolk were about 68.7% to 69.7%, 50.6% to 51.8%, 70.4%, and 57.8%. It was concluded that sodium sulfite, D-glucose,L-ascorbic, and citric acid at suitable concentrations can be used to control the formation of lysinoalanine during preserved egg processing.

Practical Application

Achieved results may be helpful to select several food ingredients or additives effective in inhibiting the toxic component lysinoalanine formation during preserved egg processing. Furthermore, it is geared toward building a lysinoalanine control system, and providing a theoretical reference for the processing of preserved egg.

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