DNA barcoding commercially important fish species of Turkey

Authors

  • Emre Keskİn,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Fisheries and Aquaculture, Agricultural Faculty, Ankara University, Dışkapı, Ankara, Turkey
    • Biotechnology Institute, Ankara University, Beşevler, Ankara, Turkey
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  • Hasan H. Atar

    1. Department of Fisheries and Aquaculture, Agricultural Faculty, Ankara University, Dışkapı, Ankara, Turkey
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Correspondence: Emre Keskin, Fax: +903123185298; E-mail: keskin@ankara.edu.tr

Abstract

DNA barcoding was used in the identification of 89 commercially important freshwater and marine fish species found in Turkish ichthyofauna. A total of 1765 DNA barcodes using a 654-bp-long fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene were generated for 89 commercially important freshwater and marine fish species found in Turkish ichthyofauna. These species belong to 70 genera, 40 families and 19 orders from class Actinopterygii, and all were associated with a distinct DNA barcode. Nine and 12 of the COI barcode clusters represent the first species records submitted to the BOLD and GenBank databases, respectively. All COI barcodes (except sequences of first species records) were matched with reference sequences of expected species, according to morphological identification. Average nucleotide frequencies of the data set were calculated as T = 29.7%, C = 28.2%, A = 23.6% and G = 18.6%. Average pairwise genetic distance among individuals were estimated as 0.32%, 9.62%, 17,90% and 22.40% for conspecific, congeneric, confamilial and within order, respectively. Kimura 2-parameter genetic distance values were found to increase with taxonomic level. For most of the species analysed in our data set, there is a barcoding gap, and an overlap in the barcoding gap exists for only two genera. Neighbour-joining trees were drawn based on DNA barcodes and all the specimens clustered in agreement with their taxonomic classification at species level. Results of this study supported DNA barcoding as an efficient molecular tool for a better monitoring, conservation and management of fisheries.

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