• Open Access

Life-long caloric restriction reduces oxidative stress and preserves nitric oxide bioavailability and function in arteries of old mice

Authors

  • Anthony J. Donato,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
    2. Veteran's Affairs Medical Center-Salt Lake City, Geriatrics Research Education and Clinical Center, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
    3. Department of Exercise and Sports Science, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
    • Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA, USA
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  • Ashley E. Walker,

    1. Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
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  • Katherine A. Magerko,

    1. Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA, USA
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  • R. Colton Bramwell,

    1. Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
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  • Alex D. Black,

    1. Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA, USA
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  • Grant D. Henson,

    1. Department of Exercise and Sports Science, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
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  • Brooke R. Lawson,

    1. Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA, USA
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  • Lisa A. Lesniewski,

    1. Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA, USA
    2. Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
    3. Veteran's Affairs Medical Center-Salt Lake City, Geriatrics Research Education and Clinical Center, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
    4. Department of Exercise and Sports Science, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
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  • Douglas R. Seals

    1. Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA, USA
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Correspondence

Dr. Anthony J. Donato, Ph.D., Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84109, USA. Tel.: +(801) 582 1565 ext. 4237; fax: +(801) 585 3884; e-mail: tony.donato@utah.edu; http://www.tvplab.utah.edu

Summary

Aging impairs arterial function through oxidative stress and diminished nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Life-long caloric restriction (CR) reduces oxidative stress, but its impact on arterial aging is incompletely understood. We tested the hypothesis that life-long CR attenuates key features of arterial aging. Blood pressure, pulse wave velocity (PWV, arterial stiffness), carotid artery wall thickness and endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD; endothelial function) were assessed in young (Y: 5–7 month), old ad libitum (Old AL: 30–31 month) and life-long 40% CR old (30–31 month) B6D2F1 mice. Blood pressure was elevated with aging (P < 0.05) and was blunted by CR (P < 0.05 vs. Old AL). PWV was 27% greater in old vs. young AL-fed mice (P < 0.05), and CR prevented this increase (P < 0.05 vs. Old AL). Carotid wall thickness was greater with age (P < 0.05), and CR reduced this by 30%. CR effects were associated with amelioration of age-related changes in aortic collagen and elastin. Nitrotyrosine, a marker of cellular oxidative stress, and superoxide production were greater in old AL vs. young (P < 0.05) and CR attenuated these increase. Carotid artery EDD was impaired with age (P < 0.05); CR prevented this by enhancing NO and reducing superoxide-dependent suppression of EDD (Both P < 0.05 vs. Old AL). This was associated with a blunted age-related increase in NADPH oxidase activity and p67 expression, with increases in superoxide dismutase (SOD), total SOD, and catalase activities (All P < 0.05 Old CR vs. Old AL). Lastly, CR normalized age-related changes in the critical nutrient-sensing pathways SIRT-1 and mTOR (P < 0.05 vs. Old AL). Our findings demonstrate that CR is an effective strategy for attenuation of arterial aging.

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