Provision of Out-of-hospital Analgesia to Older Fallers With Suspected Fractures: Above Par, but Opportunities for Improvement Exist

Authors

  • Paul M. Simpson MScM,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
    • Ambulance Service of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jason C. Bendall PhD,

    1. Ambulance Service of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Anne Tiedemann PhD,

    1. George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, Australia
    2. Neuroscience Research Australia, Sydney, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Stephen R. Lord PhD,

    1. School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
    2. University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
    3. Neuroscience Research Australia, Sydney, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jacqueline C.T. Close MD

    1. School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
    2. Neuroscience Research Australia, Sydney, Australia
    3. Prince of Wales Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author

  • The authors have no relevant financial information or potential conflicts of interest to disclose.

Address for correspondence and reprints: Paul M. Simpson; e-mail: psimpson@ambulance.nsw.gov.au

Abstract

Objectives

Paramedics frequently attend older patients who have fallen and sustained suspected fractures, a population of patients who may be at risk of inadequate analgesic care. This prospective study aimed to describe the rate and effectiveness of analgesia administered by paramedics to older patients with suspected fractures secondary to falls and to identify predictive factors associated with provision of analgesia.

Methods

A cohort of older patients aged greater than 65 years with suspected fall-related fractures was extracted from a database of 1,610 cases collected during a prospective, nonconsecutive observational study of older people who had fallen and received an ambulance response from October 1, 2010, through June 30, 2011. Fall-specific data, collected on scene by paramedics using a specially designed data form, were linked to patient clinical records and dispatch information. Descriptive analyses were performed to describe rates and effectiveness of analgesic administration, and multivariate logistic regression was conducted to identify factors associated with provision of analgesia.

Results

Of 1,610 patients in the observational study database, there were 333 patients identified as having suspected fractures, thus forming the study population. The mean (±SD) age was 82 (±8) years, and 75% were female. Suspected fractures of the hip were most common (42%). An initial pain score was recorded in 67% of cases, and the median initial pain severity was 8 of 10 (interquartile range [IQR] = 5 to 9). Overall, 60% received analgesia, and 80% of those received parenteral opiates. Intravenous (IV) morphine was most common (63%), followed by methoxyflurane (39%) and intranasal fentanyl (17%). Administration of oral analgesics was uncommon. Analgesia was considered to be clinically effective (≥30% relative reduction in pain severity) in 62% of cases. Patients with suspected hip fractures had greater odds of receiving analgesia compared to those with suspected fractures at other anatomical sites (odds ratio [OR] = 2.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.17 to 6.32; p = 0.02). Compared to those with mild pain, the odds of receiving analgesia increased significantly for patients with moderate pain (OR = 6.5, 95% CI = 2.3 to 18.8; p < 0.0001) and severe pain (OR = 31.1, 95% CI = 9.9 to 97.6; p < 0.0001).

Conclusions

In this population of older people who fell and sustained suspected fractures, two-thirds received paramedic-administered analgesia. The majority of patients received clinically effective analgesia, and the presence of a suspected hip fracture increased the likelihood of receiving pain relief.

Resumen

Administración de Analgesia Extrahospitalaria a los Ancianos con Sospecha de Fractura tras una Caída: Cumplimos (por encima del par), pero Existen Oportunidades para la Mejora

Objetivos

Los paramédicos atienden frecuentemente a los ancianos que se han caído y en los que se sospecha una fractura, los cuales constituyen una población con riesgo de recibir una atención analgésica inadecuada. Este estudio prospectivo tuvo como objetivos describir el porcentaje y la efectividad de la analgesia administrada por paramédicos a los ancianos con sospecha de fracturas secundarias a caídas e identificar los factores predictivos asociados a la administración de la analgesia.

Metodología

Se extrajo una cohorte de pacientes ancianos mayores de 65 años de edad con sospecha de fracturas relacionadas con caídas de una base de datos de 1.610 casos recogidos durante un estudio observacional prospectivo no consecutivo de ancianos que se habían caído y habían recibido una respuesta de una ambulancia desde el 1 de octubre de 2010 hasta el 30 junio de 2011. Los datos específicos de la caída recogidos en la escena por los paramédicos usando una hoja de datos especialmente diseñada se vincularon a las historias clínicas de los pacientes y a la información del traslado. Se calcularon los porcentajes y la efectividad de la administración de analgésicos, y se llevó a cabo una regresión logística multivariable para identificar los factores asociados con la administración de analgesia.

Resultados

De los 1.610 pacientes en la base de datos del estudio observacional, había 333 pacientes identificados con sospecha de fracturas, lo que formaron la población de estudio. La edad media fue de 82 años (DE 8 años), y el 75% fueron mujeres. La sospecha de fractura de cadera fue la más común (42%). Una puntuación de dolor inicial se registró en el 67% de los casos, y la mediana de intensidad de dolor inicial fue de 8 sobre 10 (RIC 5 a 9). Del total, el 60% recibió analgesia y el 80% de ellos recibió un opiáceo parenteral. La morfina intravenosa fue más común (63%), seguida de metoxiflurano (39%) y fentanilo intranasal (17%). La administración de analgésicos orales fue poco frecuente. La analgesia se consideró clínicamente efectiva (≥30% reducción relativa en la intensidad del dolor) en el 62% de los casos. Los pacientes con sospecha de fractura de cadera tuvieron mayor razón de ventaja (odds ratio, OR) de recibir analgesia comparado con otros sitios anatómicos (OR 2,7, IC95% = 1,17 a 6,32; p = 0,02). En comparación con aquéllos con dolor leve, la OR para recibir analgesia se incrementó significativamente para los pacientes con dolor moderado (OR 6,5, IC95% = 2,3 a 18,8; p < 0,0001) y dolor grave (OR 31,1, IC 95% = 9,9 a 97,6; p < 0,0001).

Conclusiones

En esta población de ancianos que se cayeron y se sospechó una fractura, dos tercios recibieron analgesia administrada por un paramédico. La mayoría de los pacientes que recibieron analgesia ésta fue clínicamente efectiva, y la presencia de una fractura de cadera incrementó la probabilidad de recibir alivio para el dolor.

Ancillary