Brief Intervention to Increase Emergency Department Uptake of Combined Rapid Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Screening Among a Drug Misusing Population

Authors

  • Roland C. Merchant MD, MPH, ScD,

    Corresponding author
    1. The Department of Emergency Medicine, Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI
    2. The Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Brown University, Providence, RI
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Janette R. Baird PhD,

    1. The Department of Emergency Medicine, Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Tao Liu PhD,

    1. The Department of Biostatistics Center for Statistical Sciences, School of Public Health, Brown University, Providence, RI
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Lynn E. Taylor MD,

    1. The Division of Infectious Diseases Department of Medicine, Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Brian T. Montague DO, MS, MPH,

    1. The Division of Infectious Diseases Department of Medicine, Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ted D. Nirenberg PhD

    1. The Department of Emergency Medicine, Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI
    2. The Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI
    Search for more papers by this author

  • This research was supported by grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (R21 DA28645), the Lifespan/Tufts/Brown Centers for AIDS Research (P30 AI042853), and the Gilead Foundation and by an unrestricted donation of rapid hepatitis C test kits from OraSure Technologies, Inc. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01419899. Dr. Merchant, an associate editor for this journal, had no role in the peer-review process or publication decision for this paper.

Abstract

Objectives

In this study, Increasing Viral Testing in the Emergency Department (InVITED), the authors investigated if a brief intervention about human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) risk-taking behaviors and drug use and misuse in addition to a self-administered risk assessment, compared to a self-administered risk assessment alone, increased uptake of combined screening for HIV and HCV, self-perception of HIV/HCV risk, and impacted beliefs and opinions on HIV/HCV screening.

Methods

InVITED was a randomized, controlled trial conducted at two urban emergency departments (EDs) from February 2011 to March 2012. ED patients who self-reported drug use within the past 3 months were invited to enroll. Drug misuse severity and need for a brief or more intensive intervention was assessed using the Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST). Participants were randomly assigned to one of two study arms: a self-administered HIV/HCV risk assessment alone (control arm) or the assessment plus a brief intervention about their drug misuse and screening for HIV/HCV (intervention arm). Beliefs on the value of combined HIV/HCV screening, self-perception of HIV/HCV risk, and opinions on HIV/HCV screening in the ED were measured in both study arms before the HIV/HCV risk assessment (pre), after the assessment in the control arm, and after the brief intervention in the intervention arm (post). Participants in both study arms were offered free combined rapid HIV/HCV screening. Uptake of screening was compared by study arm. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate factors related to uptake of screening.

Results

Of the 395 participants in the study, the median age was 28 years (interquartile range [IQR] = 23 to 38 years), 44.8% were female, 82.3% had ever been tested for HIV, and 67.3% had ever been tested for HCV. Uptake of combined rapid HIV/HCV screening was nearly identical by study arm (64.5% vs. 65.2%; Δ = –0.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = –10.1% to 8.7%). Of the 256 screened, none had reactive HIV antibody tests, but seven (2.7%) had reactive HCV antibody tests. Multivariable logistic regression analysis results indicated that uptake of screening was not related to study arm assignment, total ASSIST drug scores, need for an intervention for drug misuse, or HIV/HCV sexual risk assessment scores. However, uptake of screening was greater among participants who indicated placing a higher value on combined rapid HIV/HCV screening for themselves and all ED patients and those with higher levels of perceived HIV/HCV risk. Uptake of combined rapid HIV/HCV screening was not related to changes in beliefs regarding the value of combined HIV/HCV screening or self-perceived HIV/HCV risk (post– vs. pre–risk assessment with or without a brief intervention). Opinions regarding the ED as a venue for combined rapid HIV/HCV screening were not related to uptake of screening.

Conclusions

Uptake of combined rapid HIV/HCV screening is high and considered valuable among drug using and misusing ED patients with little concern about the ED as a screening venue. The brief intervention investigated in this study does not appear to change beliefs regarding screening, self-perceived risk, or uptake of screening for HIV/HCV in this population. Initial beliefs regarding the value of screening and self-perceived risk for these infections predict uptake of screening.

Resumen

Objetivos

El estudio Increasing Viral Testing in the Emergency Department (InVITED) investiga si una intervención breve sobre los comportamientos de riesgo en relación con el virus de inmunodeficiencia humana (VIH) y la hepatitis C (VHC), consumo y abuso de drogas, junto con una evaluación autoadministrada del riesgo, en comparación con sólo la evaluación autoadministrada del riesgo, incrementaba la aceptación de despistaje combinado de VIH y VHC, el riesgo autopercibido de VIH/VHC, y las creencias y opiniones del despistaje de VIH/VHC.

Metodología

InVITED fue un ensayo clínico controlado y aleatorizado llevado a cabo en dos SU urbanos de febrero de 2011 a marzo de 2012. Se invitó a participar a los pacientes del SU que autorefirieron consumo de drogas en los tres últimos meses. La gravedad del abuso de drogas y la necesidad de una intervención breve o más intensa se valoró usando el Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST). Los pacientes fueron asignados aleatoriamente a uno de los dos brazos del estudio: solamente evaluación autoadministrada del riesgo de VIH/VHC (grupo control) o la evaluación más una intervención breve sobre sus abusos de drogas y el despistaje de VIH/VHC (grupo de intervención). Se midieron las creencias acerca del valor del despistaje combinado VIH/VHC, la autopercepción del riesgo de VIH/VHC, y las opiniones acerca del despistaje de VIH/VHC en el SU en ambos brazos del estudio antes de la evaluación del riesgo de VIH/VHC (pre), después de la evaluación en el grupo control, y después de la intervención breve (post). Se ofreció gratuitamente un test de despistaje rápido VIH/VHC a los participantes de ambos brazos del estudio. La aceptación del despistaje se comparó según el brazo del estudio. Se usaron modelos de regresión logística multivariable para evaluar los factores relacionados con la aceptación del despistaje.

Resultados

De los 395 participantes del estudio, la mediana de edad fue de 28 años (RIC de 23 a 38), un 44,8% fueron mujeres, un 82,3% nunca había recibido un test de VIH, y un 67,3% nunca de VHC. La aceptación del despistaje rápido combinado de VIH/VHC fue prácticamente igual en ambos brazos del estudio (64,5% contra 65,2%; Δ = -0,7%; IC 95% = -10,1% a 8,7%). De los 256 a los que se les realizó el despistaje, ninguno tuvo un test de anticuerpos de VIH positivo, pero siete (2,7%) presentaron un test de anticuerpos de VHC positivo. Los resultados del análisis de regresión logística multivariable indicaron que la aceptación del despistaje no se relacionó con el brazo de asignación del estudio, el total de las puntuaciones del test ASSIST, la necesidad de una intervención sobre el abuso de drogas, o las puntuaciones de evaluación del riesgo sexual de VIH/VHC. Sin embargo, la aceptación del despistaje fue mayor entre los participantes que indicaron otorgar un mayor valor al despistaje rápido combinado de VIH/VHC para sí mismos y para todos los pacientes del SU, y aquéllos con mayores niveles de riesgo percibido de VIH/VHC. La aceptación del despistaje rápido combinado de VIH/VHC no se relacionó con cambios en las creencias sobre el valor del despistaje combinado VIH/VHC o la autopercepción del riesgo de VIH/VHC (valoración del riesgo pre, con o sin intervención breve, frente a post). Las opiniones acerca del SU como un lugar para el despistaje rápido combinado de VIH/VHC no se relacionaron con la aceptación del despistaje.

Conclusiones

La aceptación del despistaje rápido combinado de VIH/VHC es elevada y se consideró valiosa entre los pacientes del SU con consumo o abuso de drogas sin mucha preocupación sobre el SU como lugar de despistaje. La intervención breve investigada en este estudio no parece cambiar las creencias acerca del despistaje, el riesgo autopercibido, o la aceptación del despistaje de VIH/VHC en esta población. Las creencias iniciales respecto al valor del despistaje y al riesgo autopercibido para estas infecciones predijeron la aceptación del despistaje.

Ancillary