Associations Between Multivitamin Supplement Use and Alcohol Consumption Before Pregnancy: Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, 2004 to 2008

Authors

  • Lauren A. Weiss,

    Corresponding author
    • Division of Dysmorphology and Teratology, Department of Pediatrics , University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Christina D. Chambers

    1. Division of Dysmorphology and Teratology, Department of Pediatrics , University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California
    2. Division of Epidemiology , Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California
    Search for more papers by this author

Reprint requests: Lauren A. Weiss, PhD, Division of Dysmorphology and Teratology, Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0828, La Jolla, CA 92093-0828; Tel.: 858-246-1757; Fax: 858-246-1708; E-mail: lbweiss@ucsd.edu

Abstract

Background

Approximately 50 to 70% of childbearing-aged women consume alcohol and up to 23% of pregnancies have some level of prenatal alcohol exposure.

Methods

Using data from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System from 2004 to 2008, 111,644 women who completed questions relating to periconceptional alcohol use and multivitamin supplement use were included in the study. This study explored associations between periconceptional alcohol use and multivitamin supplementation use. Weighted multivariable logistic regression was used to explore associations, adjusting for maternal education, maternal ethnicity, maternal age, household income, and parity.

Results

During the periconceptional period, a dose-dependent association was found where women who consumed alcohol (≤3 drinks/wk, odds ratio [OR] = 0.76; 4 to 6 drinks/wk, OR = 0.60; 7 to 13 drinks/wk, OR = 0.49; ≥14 drinks/wk, OR = 0.39) and binged on alcohol (1 time, OR = 0.76; 2 to 3 times, OR = 0.66; 4 to 5 times, OR = 0.56; ≥6 times, OR = 0.50) were significantly less likely to take a multivitamin supplement compared with those that did not consume alcohol.

Conclusions

These findings emphasize the importance of periconceptional multivitamin supplement use, especially among alcohol-consuming women of childbearing age.

Ancillary