Addiction Biology

Cover image for Vol. 19 Issue 1

January 2014

Volume 19, Issue 1

Pages i–ii, 1–143

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. PRECLINICAL STUDIES
    4. HUMAN GENETIC STUDIES
    5. HUMAN GENOMICS STUDY
    6. HUMAN NEUROIMAGING STUDY
    1. Issue Information (pages i–ii)

      Article first published online: 17 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/adb.12090

  2. PRECLINICAL STUDIES

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. PRECLINICAL STUDIES
    4. HUMAN GENETIC STUDIES
    5. HUMAN GENOMICS STUDY
    6. HUMAN NEUROIMAGING STUDY
    1. Galantamine attenuates reinstatement of cue-induced methamphetamine-seeking behavior in mice (pages 1–4)

      Takenao Koseki, Akihiro Mouri, Shizuka Suzuki, Azusa Nakajima, Takayoshi Mamiya, Yijin Yan and Toshitaka Nabeshima

      Article first published online: 19 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1369-1600.2011.00425.x

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      Methamphetamine (METH) dependence is becoming a serious problem worldwide. The enhancement of the cholinergic nervous system is expected to greatly alleviate drug dependence. We investigated the effect of galantamine on the reinstatement of cue-induced METH-seeking behavior using a self-administration experiment. Treatment with galantamine 30 minutes before exposure to the cues suppressed the reinstatement of METH-seeking behavior. However, galantamine did not affect the cue-induced reinstatement of food-seeking behavior or locomotor activity. These results suggest that galantamine may be a candidate drug for treating relapses of METH-seeking behavior.

    2. Differential effect of beta-adrenergic receptor antagonism in basolateral amygdala on reconsolidation of aversive and appetitive memories associated with morphine in rats (pages 5–15)

      Yan Wu, Yonghui Li, Xiaoyan Yang and Nan Sui

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1369-1600.2012.00443.x

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      The present study used conditioned place preference (CPP) and conditioned place aversion (CPA) paradigms to investigate the role of BLA and its noradrenergic receptors in reconsolidation of morphine-associated emotional memory in rats. We found that inhibition of protein synthesis in BLA disrupted the reconsolidation of morphine CPP (m-CPP) and CPA related to morphine withdrawal (m-CPA).. The findings indicate that appetitive and aversive addictive memories share common neural substrates in BLA, but the specific neurotransmitter mechanism on reconsolidation of morphine-associated negative and positive memories can be dissociable.

    3. Baclofen effects on alcohol seeking, self-administration and extinction of seeking responses in a within-session design in baboons (pages 16–26)

      Angela N. Duke, Barbara J. Kaminski and Elise M. Weerts

      Article first published online: 28 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1369-1600.2012.00448.x

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      Baclofen is under investigation as a potential treatment to prevent relapse to drinking in alcohol-dependent persons. In the study, two groups of baboons were trained under a chained schedule of reinforcement (CSR), with three linked components, which were each correlated with different response requirements and cues. Baclofen may be effective in reducing craving and alcohol drinking, although the facilitation of extinction and suppression of both alcohol and Tang self-administration by baclofen suggests these effects may be related to a more general suppression of consummatory and conditioned behaviors.

    4. Binge-like ethanol consumption increases corticosterone levels and neurodegneration whereas occupancy of type II glucocorticoid receptors with mifepristone is neuroprotective (pages 27–36)

      Andrea Cippitelli, Ruslan Damadzic, Carol Hamelink, Michael Brunnquell, Annika Thorsell, Markus Heilig and Robert L. Eskay

      Article first published online: 13 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1369-1600.2012.00451.x

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      Excessive ethanol use leads to impaired memory and cognition. Using a rat model of binge-like intoxication, we tested whether elevated corticosterone (Cort) levels contribute to the neurotoxic consequences of EtOH exposure. Rats were adrenalectomized (Adx) and implanted with cholesterol pellets, or cholesterol pellets containing Cort in order to achieve basal, medium, or high blood concentrations of Cort. Intragastric EtOH or an isocaloric control solution was given three times daily for 4 days to achieve blood alcohol levels ranging between 200 and 350 mg/dl.

    5. Effects of adolescent nicotine exposure and withdrawal on intravenous cocaine self-administration during adulthood in male C57BL/6J mice (pages 37–48)

      Price E. Dickson, Mellessa M. Miller, Tiffany D. Rogers, Charles D. Blaha and Guy Mittleman

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1369-1600.2012.00496.x

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      Studies of adolescent drug use show a pattern in which the use of tobacco precedes the use of other drugs and a positive relationship between adolescent tobacco use and later drug use. These observations have led to the hypothesis that a causal relationship exists between early exposure to nicotine and the later use of hard drugs such as cocaine.  Using male C57BL/6J mice, we tested the hypothesis that nicotine exposure in adolescence leads to increased intravenous self-administration (IVSA) of cocaine in adulthood.

    6. Modafinil attenuates reinstatement of cocaine seeking: role for cystine–glutamate exchange and metabotropic glutamate receptors (pages 49–60)

      Stephen V. Mahler, Megan Hensley-Simon, Pouya Tahsili-Fahadan, Ryan T. LaLumiere, Charles Thomas, Rebecca V. Fallon, Peter W. Kalivas and Gary Aston-Jones

      Article first published online: 27 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1369-1600.2012.00506.x

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      A primary effect of modafinil is to inhibit dopamine transport, which typically promotes rather than inhibits motivated behavior. We examined the role of nucleus accumbens extracellular glutamate and the group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR2/3) in modafinil effects. One group of rats was trained to self-administer cocaine for 10 days and extinguished, then given priming injections of cocaine to elicit reinstatement. Modafinil- inhibited reinstated cocaine seeking, and this effect was prevented by pre-treatment with bilateral microinjections of the mGluR2/3 antagonist LY-341495 (LY) into nucleus accumbens core. 

    7. Involving the cerebellum in cocaine-induced memory: pattern of cFos expression in mice trained to acquire conditioned preference for cocaine (pages 61–76)

      María Carbo-Gas, Dolores Vazquez-Sanroman, Luisa Aguirre-Manzo, Genaro A. Coria-Avila, Jorge Manzo, Carla Sanchis-Segura and Marta Miquel

      Article first published online: 28 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/adb.12042

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      We aim to investigate the pattern of neuronal activation (as revealed by cFos expression) in different regions of the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum of mice trained to develop conditioned preference for an olfactory stimulus (CS+) paired with cocaine. Our results indicate that CS+ preference was directly associated with cFos expression in cells at the apical region of the granule cell layer of the cerebellar vermis; this relationship being more prominent in some specific lobules.

    8. Relapse to cocaine-seeking after abstinence is regulated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A in the prefrontal cortex (pages 77–86)

      Wei-Lun Sun, Nortorious T. Coleman, Agnieszka Zelek-Molik, Sarah M. Barry, Timothy W. Whitfield Jr and Jacqueline F. McGinty

      Article first published online: 6 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/adb.12043

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      We examined whether dysregulation of PKA-mediated molecular targets in PFC-NAc neurons occurs during abstinence and, if so, whether it contributes to cocaine-seeking. We measured the phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (Ser133) and GluA1 (Ser845) in the dorsomedial (dm) PFC and the presynaptic marker, synapsin I (Ser9, Ser62/67, Ser603), in the NAc after 7 days of abstinence from cocaine SA with or without cue-induced cocaine-seeking.  

    9. The role of ventral and dorsal striatum mGluR5 in relapse to cocaine-seeking and extinction learning (pages 87–101)

      Lori A. Knackstedt, Heather L. Trantham-Davidson and Marek Schwendt

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/adb.12061

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      We investigated the role of mGluR5 in the ventral and dorsal striatum in regulating cocaine-seeking following both abstinence and extinction. Our data indicates that dSTR mGluR5 plays an essential role in extinction learning but not cocaine relapse, while NA core mGluR5 modulates drug-seeking following both extinction and abstinence from cocaine self-administration.

  3. HUMAN GENETIC STUDIES

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. PRECLINICAL STUDIES
    4. HUMAN GENETIC STUDIES
    5. HUMAN GENOMICS STUDY
    6. HUMAN NEUROIMAGING STUDY
    1. Comparative gene expression profiling analysis of lymphoblastoid cells reveals neuron-specific enolase gene (ENO2) as a susceptibility gene of heroin dependence (pages 102–110)

      Ding-Lieh Liao, Min-Chih Cheng, Chih-Hao Lai, Hui-Ju Tsai and Chia-Hsiang Chen

      Article first published online: 13 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1369-1600.2011.00390.x

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      Heroin dependence is a complex mental disorder resulting from interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Identifying the susceptibility genes of heroin dependence is the basis for understanding the pathogenesis of heroin dependence. Using a total gene expression microarray, we detected 924 differentially expressed gene transcripts in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) between 19 male heroin-dependent individuals and 20 male control subjects, including 279 upregulated and 645 downregulated gene transcripts in heroin-dependent individuals.

    2. Association of OPRD1 polymorphisms with heroin dependence in a large case-control series (pages 111–121)

      Elliot C. Nelson, Michael T. Lynskey, Andrew C. Heath, Naomi Wray, Arpana Agrawal, Fiona L. Shand, Anjali K. Henders, Leanne Wallace, Alexandre A. Todorov, Andrew J. Schrage, Pamela A. F. Madden, Louisa Degenhardt, Nicholas G. Martin and Grant W. Montgomery

      Article first published online: 13 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1369-1600.2012.00445.x

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      Genes encoding the opioid receptors (OPRM1, OPRD1 and OPRK1) are obvious candidates for involvement in risk for heroin dependence.. Participants for the current investigation included 1459 heroin-dependent cases ascertained from maintenance clinics in New South Wales, Australia, 1495 unrelated individuals selected from an Australian sample of twins and siblings as not meeting DSM-IV criteria for lifetime alcohol or illicit drug dependence (non-dependent controls) and 531 controls ascertained from economically disadvantaged neighborhoods in proximity to the maintenance clinics. 

  4. HUMAN GENOMICS STUDY

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. PRECLINICAL STUDIES
    4. HUMAN GENETIC STUDIES
    5. HUMAN GENOMICS STUDY
    6. HUMAN NEUROIMAGING STUDY
    1. Ventral midbrain correlation between genetic variation and expression of the dopamine transporter gene in cocaine-abusing versus non-abusing subjects (pages 122–131)

      Yanhong Zhou, Sharon K. Michelhaugh, Carl J. Schmidt, Jun S. Liu, Michael J. Bannon and Zhicheng Lin

      Article first published online: 26 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1369-1600.2011.00391.x

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      This study investigated the correlation between seven markers throughout hDAT and its mRNA levels in postmortem ventral midbrain tissues from 18 cocaine abusers and 18 strictly matched drug-free controls in the African-American population. We show that one major haplotype with the same frequency in cocaine abusers versus drug-free controls displays a 37.1% reduction of expression levels in cocaine abusers compared with matched controls (P = 0.0057). Findings suggest that varying hDAT activity is attributable to both genetics and cocaine abuse.

  5. HUMAN NEUROIMAGING STUDY

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. PRECLINICAL STUDIES
    4. HUMAN GENETIC STUDIES
    5. HUMAN GENOMICS STUDY
    6. HUMAN NEUROIMAGING STUDY
    1. Interactive effects of chronic cigarette smoking and age on brain volumes in controls and alcohol-dependent individuals in early abstinence (pages 132–143)

      Timothy C. Durazzo, Anderson Mon, David Pennington, Christoph Abé, Stefan Gazdzinski and Dieter J. Meyerhoff

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1369-1600.2012.00492.x

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      We performed 1.5 T quantitative magnetic resonance imaging in non-smoking controls [non-smoking light drinking controls (nsCONs); n = 54], smoking light drinking controls (sCONs, n = 34), and one-week abstinent, treatment-seeking alcohol-dependent (ALC) non-smokers (nsALCs, n = 35) and smokers (sALCs, n = 43), to evaluate the independent and interactive effects of alcohol dependence and chronic smoking on regional cortical and subcortical brain volumes, emphasizing the brain reward/executive oversight system (BREOS). The findings indicate that consideration of smoking status is necessary for a better understanding of the factors contributing to regional brain atrophy in AUD.

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