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UK Bans Khat

  1. Top of page
  2. UK Bans Khat
  3. Mandatory Alcohol Treatment in Northern Territory
  4. New Law in Ecuador Allows Possession of Small Drug Amounts
  5. Naloxone Website Launched
  6. Unique Guide to Intervention-Related Research Evidence and Guidance
  7. Rise in Deaths from Prescription Painkiller Overdoses among Us Women
  8. Improving Service Provision in Low Income Countries
  9. Conferences and Events

The UK Home Secretary has announced that khat is to be a controlled substance under the UK's Misuse of Drugs Act (MDA). Khat is already banned in most of Europe and in a number of other countries, including the US and Canada. In January 2013 the Government's Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) said that khat should remain a legal substance and that there was ‘insufficient evidence’ that it caused health problems. Despite the ACMD's advice, in a statement the Home Secretary Theresa May said ‘The Government will ban khat so that we can protect vulnerable members of our communities and send a clear message to our international partners and khat smugglers that the UK is serious about stopping the illegal trafficking of khat.’ She continued ‘Failure to take decisive action and change the UK's legislative position on khat would place the UK at a serious risk of becoming a single, regional hub for the illegal onward trafficking.’ Khat will be a Class C drug under the MDA with maximum penalties of up to two years' imprisonment and a fine for possession, while supplying the drug will carry up to 14 years' imprisonment and a fine. However, the Home Secretary said a ‘proportionate’ system would be put in place for khat possession and users could be handed a warning or an on-the-spot fine.

Mandatory Alcohol Treatment in Northern Territory

  1. Top of page
  2. UK Bans Khat
  3. Mandatory Alcohol Treatment in Northern Territory
  4. New Law in Ecuador Allows Possession of Small Drug Amounts
  5. Naloxone Website Launched
  6. Unique Guide to Intervention-Related Research Evidence and Guidance
  7. Rise in Deaths from Prescription Painkiller Overdoses among Us Women
  8. Improving Service Provision in Low Income Countries
  9. Conferences and Events

The Guardian reports that the Northern Territory (NT) government in Australia has passed legislation which says anyone who is taken into protective custody for drunkenness three times in two months will be assessed and could spend three months in alcohol rehabilitation. Patients could also face criminal charges, fines, and a potential three-month jail sentence if they repeatedly abscond from rehabilitation programmes. Four mandatory treatment centres are to be set up over the next 18 months and a fifth centre may also be opened. The draft legislation was heavily criticised by indigenous groups, medical bodies and justice advocates who argued it criminalises drunkenness. North Australian Aboriginal Justice Agency chief executive officer Priscilla Collins said the new law could mean a significant increase of alcoholics in prison and urged that the health issues be looked at directly. NT police imprison up to five times the national average of people—826 per 100,000—and 85% of those are Aboriginal people. ‘By next year we will have a 1000-bed prison at the cost of $498 million built, and it's going to be full.’ Collins said. ‘By December 2016 they're going to need another 1000-bed prison,’ she continued ‘Let's stop the ‘lock-up’ approach and deal with the issues as to why people come into contact with the system.’

New Law in Ecuador Allows Possession of Small Drug Amounts

  1. Top of page
  2. UK Bans Khat
  3. Mandatory Alcohol Treatment in Northern Territory
  4. New Law in Ecuador Allows Possession of Small Drug Amounts
  5. Naloxone Website Launched
  6. Unique Guide to Intervention-Related Research Evidence and Guidance
  7. Rise in Deaths from Prescription Painkiller Overdoses among Us Women
  8. Improving Service Provision in Low Income Countries
  9. Conferences and Events

El Telegrafo reports that a new law allows citizens of Ecuador to carry cannabis, cocaine, heroin, ecstasy or amphetamines in small amounts with them without penalty. The Health Ministry set the limits at 10 grams of cannabis, 2 grams of crack cocaine, 1 gram of cocaine, 0.01 grams of heroin, 0.01 grams of ecstasy and 0.04 grams of amphetamines. The state attorney general, Diego Garcia, said that ‘the law allows consumption and considers it as not criminal, but that cultivation, trafficking and sale of either small or high amounts remains illegal.’ He added that ‘we must start from a clear recognition that in Ecuador, according to the Constitution (Article 364), we do not criminalize drug use. We consider it as a health problem and not a crime.’

Naloxone Website Launched

  1. Top of page
  2. UK Bans Khat
  3. Mandatory Alcohol Treatment in Northern Territory
  4. New Law in Ecuador Allows Possession of Small Drug Amounts
  5. Naloxone Website Launched
  6. Unique Guide to Intervention-Related Research Evidence and Guidance
  7. Rise in Deaths from Prescription Painkiller Overdoses among Us Women
  8. Improving Service Provision in Low Income Countries
  9. Conferences and Events

A coalition of harm reduction organizations has launched a new website with information on how to use naloxone for overdose prevention and where to obtain supplies. The website has three main sections: ideas for starting a naloxone programme, resources to help run a programme, and tools to help advocacy of expanded naloxone access.

Source: Naloxoneinfo.org

Unique Guide to Intervention-Related Research Evidence and Guidance

  1. Top of page
  2. UK Bans Khat
  3. Mandatory Alcohol Treatment in Northern Territory
  4. New Law in Ecuador Allows Possession of Small Drug Amounts
  5. Naloxone Website Launched
  6. Unique Guide to Intervention-Related Research Evidence and Guidance
  7. Rise in Deaths from Prescription Painkiller Overdoses among Us Women
  8. Improving Service Provision in Low Income Countries
  9. Conferences and Events

Drug and Alcohol Findings has produced the Matrices, the first ever web-based guides to the best evidence available to support interventions for adults with drug and alcohol problems. The Matrices have been developed for the UK's Substance Misuse Skills Consortium to aid the development of the British drug and alcohol treatment workforce and of treatment services. Aimed at treatment staff, managers and funders, the Matrices are practical guides with research evidence placed within the contexts in which interventions are presented. The format of the Matrices is two 25 cell grids, one for drugs and one for alcohol, with intervention levels from practitioner to treatment system across the top of the grid, intersecting with five intervention types including medical treatments, psychosocial therapies, or criminal justice work. Within each cell are summaries of the major historical and contemporary research landmarks in that area, reviews of relevant research, links to expert guidance based on this research, and an option to explore the research literature beyond the dozen or so selected documents in the cell.

Rise in Deaths from Prescription Painkiller Overdoses among Us Women

  1. Top of page
  2. UK Bans Khat
  3. Mandatory Alcohol Treatment in Northern Territory
  4. New Law in Ecuador Allows Possession of Small Drug Amounts
  5. Naloxone Website Launched
  6. Unique Guide to Intervention-Related Research Evidence and Guidance
  7. Rise in Deaths from Prescription Painkiller Overdoses among Us Women
  8. Improving Service Provision in Low Income Countries
  9. Conferences and Events

A study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that deaths related to opiate pain relievers are increasing at a faster rate among women than men. Opiate pain reliever deaths among women increased five-fold in the decade from 1999 to 2010, climbing to 6,631, up from 1,287, while prescription painkiller deaths among men jumped 3.6 times, to 10,020 during the same period. The bulk of the deaths from prescription opioids was in middle-aged women, with 1,515 deaths in 2010 in women aged 35 to 44 and 2,239 deaths in women from 45 to 54. 17,000 people die each year from opiate overdoses in the USA, more than quadruple the number of a decade ago. Drawing on data from the National Vital Statistics System and the Drug Abuse Warning Network, the study also showed that 943,365 women attended emergency departments in 2010 because of drug misuse or abuse. ‘Prescription painkiller deaths have skyrocketed in women,’ said CDC director Dr. Tom Frieden. ‘Stopping this epidemic in women – and in men – is everyone's business. Doctors need to be cautious about prescribing and patients about using these drugs.’

Improving Service Provision in Low Income Countries

  1. Top of page
  2. UK Bans Khat
  3. Mandatory Alcohol Treatment in Northern Territory
  4. New Law in Ecuador Allows Possession of Small Drug Amounts
  5. Naloxone Website Launched
  6. Unique Guide to Intervention-Related Research Evidence and Guidance
  7. Rise in Deaths from Prescription Painkiller Overdoses among Us Women
  8. Improving Service Provision in Low Income Countries
  9. Conferences and Events

MhGAP is The World Health Organisation's action plan to scale up services for mental, neurological and substance use disorders for countries especially with low and lower middle incomes. The priority conditions addressed by mhGAP include depression, schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders and alcohol and drug disorders. The mhGAP package consists of interventions for prevention and management for each of the priority conditions. MhGAP produces a regular newsletter with details of new projects and initiatives supporting the mhGAP initiative.

Conferences and Events

  1. Top of page
  2. UK Bans Khat
  3. Mandatory Alcohol Treatment in Northern Territory
  4. New Law in Ecuador Allows Possession of Small Drug Amounts
  5. Naloxone Website Launched
  6. Unique Guide to Intervention-Related Research Evidence and Guidance
  7. Rise in Deaths from Prescription Painkiller Overdoses among Us Women
  8. Improving Service Provision in Low Income Countries
  9. Conferences and Events

International Conference for the 20th anniversary of the Research Institute for Public Health and Addiction, 9–10 September 2013, Zurich University, Zurich, Switzerland. Website: http://www.isgf.ch/

5th Addiction and Mental Health Research Showcase, 11–13 September 2013, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Website: http://www.mentalhealthresearch.ca/KeyInitiatives/Showcase/Pages/Showcase2013.aspx

Second International Conference on Novel Psychoactive Substances, 12–13 September 2013, Swansea University, Swansea, UK. Website: http://www.novelpsychoactivesubstances.org/

National Conference on Addiction Disorders (NCAD) 2013, 21–25 September 2013, Anaheim, California, USA. Website: http://www.addictionpro.com/ncad-conference/national-conference-addiction-disorders-2013

American College of Clinical Pharmacology (ACCP) 2013 Annual Meeting, 22–24 September 2013, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Website: http://www.accp1.org/2013_meeting.shtml

Canadian Psychiatric Association Annual Conference, 26–28 September 2013, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Website: http://www.cpa-apc.org

Canadian Society of Addiction Medicine (CSAM) Annual Meeting and Scientific Conference, 26–28 September 2013, Vancouver, Canada. Website: http://www.csam.org/Annual_Meeting/

California Association of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counsellors/California Foundation for the Advancement of Addiction Professionals (CAADAC/CFAAP) 33rd Annual Conference, 3–6 October 2013, Sacramento, California USA. Website: https://www.caadac.org/news/annual_conference/

Addiction Neuroethics Conference 2013: Neuroethics Down-under, 4 October 2013, Herston, Queensland, Australia. Website: http://www.uqccr.uq.edu.au/neuroethics/conference.aspx

26th European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP) Congress, 5–9 October 2013, Barcelona, Spain. Website: http://www.ecnp.eu/en/Congress2013/ECNP%20Congress.aspx

Global Alcohol Policy Conference 2013, 7–9 October 2013, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Website: http://gapc2013.com

NAADAC (the Association for Addiction Professionals) National Conference, 11–14 October 2013, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. Website: http://naadac.org/conferences

California Society of Addiction Medicine (CSAM) Addiction Medicine State of the Art 2013, 16–19 October 2013, San Diego, California, USA. Website: http://www.csam-asam.org/

3rd International Congress on Dual Disorder, 23–26 October 2013, Barcelona, Spain. Website: http://www.patologiadual.es/cipd2013/

American Public Health Association (APHA) 2013 Annual Meeting, 2–6 November 2013, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Website: http://www.apha.org/meetings/AnnualMeeting/

Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse National Conference: Issues of Substance 2013, 4–6 November 2013, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Website: http://www.issuesofsubstance.ca

53rd DHS (German Centre for Addiction Issues) Conference: Addiction and Work, 4–6 November 2013, Essen, Germany. Website: http://www.dhs.de

Society for the Study of Addiction Annual Symposium, 7–8 November 2013, York UK. Website: http://www.addiction-ssa.org/ssa_10.htm

37th Annual Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse (AMERSA) Conference, 7–9 November 2013, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Website: http://www.amersa.org/conf.asp

American Association for the Treatment of Opioid Dependence (AATOD) National Conference, 9–13 November 2013, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Website: http://www.aatod.org/

International Society of Addiction Medicine (ISAM) 2013 Annual Meeting, 21–23 November 2013, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Website: http://www.isam2013.org/content.aspx/HOME

Australian Professional Society on Alcohol and Other Drugs (APSAD) Scientific Conference 2013, 24–27 November 2013, Brisbane, Australia. Website: http://www.apsadconference.com.au/

2013 International Drug Policy Symposium, 27–29 November 2013, Auckland, New Zealand. Website: http://www.drugfoundation.org.nz/cannabis-and-health

24th American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry (AAAP) Annual Meeting and Symposium, 5–8 December 2013, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA. Website: http://www.aaap.org/meetings-and-events/2013-annual-meeting

American College of Psychiatrists Annual Meeting, 19–23 February 2014, San Antonio, Texas, USA. Website: http://www.acpsych.org/meetings-and-news/annual-meeting/future-annual-meetings

College on Problems of Drug Dependence (CPDD) Annual Meeting, 14–19 June 2014, San Juan, Puerto Rico. Website: http://www.cpdd.vcu.edu/Pages/Meetings/FutureMeet.html

News and Notes welcomes contributions from its readers. Send your material to John Witton, News and Notes Editor, Addiction, National Addiction Centre PO48, 4 Windsor Walk, London SE5 8AF. Fax +44 (0)20 7848 5966; e-mail john.witton@kcl.ac.uk

Conference entries should be sent to Jean O'Reilly at jean@addictionjournal.org. Subject to editorial review, we will be glad to print, free of charge, details of your conference or event, up to 75 words and one entry only. Please send your notification three months before you wish the entry to appear.