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Effectiveness of proactive quitline counselling for smoking parents recruited through primary schools: results of a randomized controlled trial

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Abstract

Aims

To test the effectiveness of tailored quitline (telephone) counselling among smoking parents recruited into cessation support through their children's primary schools.

Design

Two-arm randomized controlled trial with 3- and 12-month follow-up.

Setting

Proactive telephone counselling was administered by the Dutch national quitline.

Participants

Smoking parents were recruited through their children's primary schools and received either intensive quitline support in combination with tailored supplementary materials (n = 256) or a standard self-help brochure (n = 256).

Measurements

The primary outcome was 7-day point-prevalence abstinence at 12-month follow-up. Also measured were baseline characteristics, use of and adherence to nicotine replacement therapy and pharmacotherapy, smoking characteristics and implementation of a home smoking ban.

Findings

Parents who received quitline counselling were more likely to report 7-day point-prevalence abstinence at 12-month assessment [34.0 versus 18.0%, odds ratio (OR) = 2.35, confidence interval (CI) = 1.56–3.54] than those who received a standard self-help brochure. Parents who received quitline counselling were more likely to use nicotine replacement therapy (P < 0.001) than those who received a standard self-help brochure. Among parents who did not achieve abstinence, those who received quitline counselling smoked fewer cigarettes at 3-month (P < 0.001) and 12-month assessment (P < 0.001), were more likely to make a quit attempt (P < 0.001), to achieve 24 hours' abstinence (P < 0.001) and to implement a complete home smoking ban (P < 0.01).

Conclusions

Intensive quitline support tailored to smoking parents is an effective method for helping parents quit smoking and promoting parenting practices that protect their children from adverse effects of smoking.

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