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Serum Proinflammatory Cytokine Responses to Influenza Virus Vaccine among Women during Pregnancy versus Non-Pregnancy

Authors

  • Lisa M. Christian,

    Corresponding author
    1. The Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA
    2. Department of Psychology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
    3. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA
    • Department of Psychiatry, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA
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  • Kyle Porter,

    1. Center for Biostatistics, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA
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  • Erik Karlsson,

    1. Department of Infectious Diseases, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA
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  • Stacey Schultz-Cherry,

    1. Department of Infectious Diseases, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA
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  • Jay D. Iams

    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH, USA
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Correspondence

Lisa M. Christian, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, Room 112, 460 Medical Center Drive, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.

E-mail: Lisa.Christian@osumc.edu

Abstract

Objective

This study aimed to comprehensively describe inflammatory responses to trivalent influenza virus vaccine (TIV) among pregnant women and determine whether responses differ compared to non-pregnancy.

Methods

Twenty-eight pregnant and 28 non-pregnant women were vaccinated. Serum cytokines were measured at baseline, and 1, 2, and 3 days post-vaccination. Anti-influenza antibody titers were measured at baseline and 1 month post-vaccination.

Results

Overall, following vaccination, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin(IL)-6 increased significantly, peaking at 1 day post-vaccination (P's < 0.001). Pregnant versus non-pregnant women showed no differences in IL-6, TNF-α, or IL-1β responses. Pregnant women showed no change in IL-8 and increases in migration inhibitory factor (MIF), while non-pregnant showed decreases in both. Pregnancy did not significantly alter antibody responses.

Conclusions

Inflammatory responses to TIV are mild, transient, and generally similar in pregnant and non-pregnant women. Given the variability evidenced, vaccination may provide a useful model for studying individual differences in inflammatory response propensity.

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