How effective is self-weighing in the setting of a lifestyle intervention to reduce gestational weight gain and postpartum weight retention?

Authors

  • Cheryce L. Harrison,

    Corresponding author
    1. Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation (MCHRI), School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
    • Correspondence: Dr Cheryce Harrison, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Level 1, 43-51 Kanooka Grove, Clayton Vic. 31168, Australia. Email: cheryce.harrison@monash.edu

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  • Helena J. Teede,

    1. Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation (MCHRI), School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
    2. Diabetes Unit, Monash Health, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
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  • Catherine B. Lombard

    1. Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation (MCHRI), School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
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  • Conflict of interest: The authors declare they have no competing interests.

Abstract

Self-weighing is important for weight management in general populations; however its role in optimising gestational weight gain is less clear. Our randomised trial in early pregnancy found regular self-weighing when combined with a self-management intervention, optimised weight gain at 28 weeks gestation (5.66 ± 2.6 kg vs 7.03 ± 3.56 kg, = 0.02) and reduced postpartum weight retention (−0.57 ± 3.94 kg vs 1.48 ± 5.49 kg, < 0.05) compared with control participants. Results highlight the importance of self-monitoring strategies during pregnancy.

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