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Keywords:

  • Cardiac disease in transplant;
  • coronary artery disease;
  • lung transplant;
  • revascularization;
  • surgery—heart, lung, transplant

Abstract

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is not uncommon among lung transplant candidates. Several small, single-center series have suggested that short-term outcomes are acceptable in selected patients who undergo coronary revascularization prior to, or concomitant with, lung transplantation. Our objective was to evaluate perioperative and intermediate-term outcomes in this patient population at our institution. We performed a retrospective, observational cohort analysis of 898 lung transplant recipients between 1997 and 2010. Pediatric, multivisceral, lobar or repeat transplantations were excluded, resulting in 791 patients for comparative analysis, of which 49 (median age 62, 79.6% bilateral transplant) underwent concurrent coronary artery bypass and 38 (median age 64, 63.2% bilateral transplant) received preoperative percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Perioperative mortality, overall unadjusted survival and adjusted hazard ratio for cumulative risk of death were similar among both revascularization groups as well as controls. The rate of postoperative major adverse cardiac events was also similar among groups; however, concurrent coronary artery bypass was associated with longer postoperative length of stay, more time in the intensive care unit and more postoperative days requiring ventilator support. These results suggest that patients with CAD need not be excluded from lung transplantation. Preferential consideration should be given to preoperative PCI when feasible.