Risk of Kidney Stones With Surgical Intervention in Living Kidney Donors

Authors

  • S. M. Thomas,

    1. Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada
    2. Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada
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  • N. N. Lam,

    1. Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada
    2. Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada
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  • B. K. Welk,

    1. Division of Urology, St. Joseph's Health Care, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada
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  • C. Nguan,

    1. Department of Urologic Sciences, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
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  • A. Huang,

    1. Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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  • D. M. Nash,

    1. Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada
    2. Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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  • G. V. R. Prasad,

    1. Division of Nephrology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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  • G. A. Knoll,

    1. Division of Nephrology, Kidney Research Centre, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    2. Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
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  • J. J. Koval,

    1. Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada
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  • K. L. Lentine,

    1. Center for Outcomes Research, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO
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  • S. J. Kim,

    1. Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    2. Division of Nephrology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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  • C. E. Lok,

    1. Division of Nephrology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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  • A. X. Garg,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada
    2. Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada
    3. Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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  • for the Donor Nephrectomy Outcomes Research (DONOR) Network


  • Donor Nephrectomy Outcomes Research (DONOR) Network Investigators: Jennifer Arnold, Neil Boudville, Ann Bugeya, Christine Dipchand, Mona Doshi, Liane Feldman, Amit Garg, Colin Geddes, Eric Gibney, John Gill, Martin Karpinski, Joseph Kim, Scott Klarenbach, Greg Knoll, Charmaine Lok, Philip McFarlane, Mauricio Monroy Cuadros, Norman Muirhead, Immaculate Nevis, Christopher Y. Nguan, Chirag Parikh, Emilio Poggio, G. V. Ramesh Prasad, Leroy Storsley, Ken Taub, Sonia Thomas, Darin Treleaven, Ann Young.

Abstract

A kidney stone in a person with a solitary kidney requires urgent attention, which may result in surgical and/or hospital attention. We conducted a matched retrospective cohort study to determine if living kidney donors compared to healthy nondonors have a higher risk of: (i) kidney stones with surgical intervention, and (ii) hospital encounters for kidney stones. We reviewed all predonation charts for living kidney donations from 1992 to 2009 at five major transplant centers in Ontario, Canada, and linked this information to healthcare databases. We selected nondonors from the healthiest segment of the general population and matched 10 nondonors to every donor. Of the 2019 donors and 20 190 nondonors, none had evidence of kidney stones prior to cohort entry. Median follow-up time was 8.4 years (maximum 19.7 years; loss to follow-up <7%). There was no difference in the rate of kidney stones with surgical intervention in donors compared to nondonors (8.3 vs. 9.7 events/10 000 person-years; rate ratio 0.85; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.47–1.53). Similarly there was no difference in the rate of hospital encounters for kidney stones (12.1 vs. 16.1 events/10 000 person-years; rate ratio 0.75; 95% CI 0.45–1.24). These interim results are reassuring for the safety of living kidney donation.

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