Revisiting the Safety of Living Liver Donors by Reassessing 441 Donor Hepatectomies: Is a Larger Hepatectomy Complication-Prone?

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Abstract

Donor safety is of paramount importance in performing living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). We retrospectively reviewed donor medical records to confirm whether larger donor hepatectomy is absolutely complication-prone. A total of 441 living donor hepatectomies were performed between October 1996 and July 2012 in our institute, which were divided into three eras (Era I, October 1996 to March 2004; Era II, April 2004 to March 2008; Era III, April 2008 to July 2012) and the incidences of postoperative complications were compared among the three types of hepatectomy—right hepatectomy (RH), left hepatectomy (LH) and left lateral segmentectomy (LLS). Although severe complications (Clavien's grade 3 or more) frequently occurred in RH in Eras I and II (15.4% and 10.7%, respectively), the incidence in Era III decreased to the comparable level observed in LH and LLS (5.4% in RH, 2.3% in LH and 5.3% in LLS). The incidence of postoperative complications did not relate to the type of hepatectomy selected in the latest era. Since most complications after hepatectomy were considered preventable, step-by-step meticulous surgical procedures are a prerequisite for further assuring donor safety irrespective of the type of hepatectomy selected.

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