Death-Defining Immune Responses After Apoptosis

Authors

  • L. Campisi,

    1. Department of Medicine, Immunology Institute and Tisch Cancer Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.
  • R. J. Cummings,

    1. Department of Medicine, Immunology Institute and Tisch Cancer Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.
  • J. Magarian Blander

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Medicine, Immunology Institute and Tisch Cancer Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY
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Abstract

Apoptosis is a programmed form of cell death whereby characteristic internal cellular dismantling is accompanied by the preservation of plasma membrane integrity. Maintaining this order during apoptosis prevents the release of cellular contents and ensures a noninflammatory death. Here, we consider examples of apoptosis in different contexts and discuss how the same form of cell death could have different immunological consequences. Multiple parameters such as cell death as a result of microbial infection, the nature of the inflammatory microenvironment, the type of responding phagocytic cells and the genetic background of the host organism all differentially influence the immunological consequences of apoptosis.

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