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American Journal of Transplantation

Cover image for Vol. 13 Issue 2

February 2013

Volume 13, Issue 2

Pages 243–529

  1. The AJT Report

    1. Top of page
    2. The AJT Report
    3. Literature Watch
    4. Editorials
    5. Comprehensive Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Meeting Reports
    8. Original Articles
    9. Brief Communication
    10. Case Report
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Book Reviews
    13. Images in Transplantation
    14. Letter to the Editor
    15. Erratum
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      The AJT Report: News and issues that affect organ and tissue transplantation (pages 243–244)

      Sue Pondrom

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.12170

      With implementation of the Affordable Care Act, accountable care organizations and a possible new kidney allocation policy around the corner, what's in store for renal wait list management? This month, we review what these policies may mean for pre-operative testing guidelines, and how transplant centers may need to reevaluate their approach to managing their wait list patients. Additionally, we'll review the key features of the newly proposed kidney allocation policy.

  2. Literature Watch

    1. Top of page
    2. The AJT Report
    3. Literature Watch
    4. Editorials
    5. Comprehensive Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Meeting Reports
    8. Original Articles
    9. Brief Communication
    10. Case Report
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Book Reviews
    13. Images in Transplantation
    14. Letter to the Editor
    15. Erratum
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      Literature Watch: Implications for transplantation (page 245)

      Sheri M. Krams and Jonathan S. Bromberg

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.12171

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      Recent research from the ENCODE project reports that the large stretches of noncoding DNA found in the human genome are not “junk” DNA, as once believed, but do indeed have biochemical function. These findings may have profound implications in the understanding of human variation and how changes in the genome result in disease.

  3. Editorials

    1. Top of page
    2. The AJT Report
    3. Literature Watch
    4. Editorials
    5. Comprehensive Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Meeting Reports
    8. Original Articles
    9. Brief Communication
    10. Case Report
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Book Reviews
    13. Images in Transplantation
    14. Letter to the Editor
    15. Erratum
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      Measuring the Disparity Gap: Quality Improvement to Eliminate Health Disparities in Kidney Transplantation (pages 247–248)

      R. E. Patzer and S. O. Pastan

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.12060

      A recent Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality report on disparities finds no evidence-based quality improvement interventions that have reduced disparities in end-stage renal disease, emphasizing the need for studies that assess both the effectiveness of the intervention and examine disparities reduction as an outcome.

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      DCD ECD Kidneys—Can You Make a Silk Purse From a Sow's Ear? (pages 249–250)

      Stephen McDonald and Philip Clayton

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.12054

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      The use of deceased donor kidneys meeting expanded criteria is on the rise; the effect of these combined risk factors appears additive but not multiplicative. See article by Singh and Kim on page 329.

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      Program-Specific Reports for Pancreas Transplantation: Comparing Apples and Oranges, Apples After Oranges and Apples Alone (pages 251–252)

      J. A. Fridell and R. J. Stratta

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.12033

      The authors discuss the article by Kasiske et al (page 337), which presents a model for establishing expected graft- and patient-survival outcomes following pancreas transplantation.

  4. Comprehensive Review

    1. Top of page
    2. The AJT Report
    3. Literature Watch
    4. Editorials
    5. Comprehensive Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Meeting Reports
    8. Original Articles
    9. Brief Communication
    10. Case Report
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Book Reviews
    13. Images in Transplantation
    14. Letter to the Editor
    15. Erratum
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      Biliary Complications After Liver Transplantation: Old Problems and New Challenges (pages 253–265)

      D. Seehofer, D. Eurich, W. Veltzke-Schlieker and P. Neuhaus

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.12034

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      Prevention and treatment of anastomotic and non-anastomotic biliary complications become increasingly important in liver transplantation, since these mainly occur after transplantation from living donors, marginal donors, or non-heart-beating donors, which represent a large part of liver transplantation in many countries.

  5. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. The AJT Report
    3. Literature Watch
    4. Editorials
    5. Comprehensive Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Meeting Reports
    8. Original Articles
    9. Brief Communication
    10. Case Report
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Book Reviews
    13. Images in Transplantation
    14. Letter to the Editor
    15. Erratum
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      Recent Progress in the Pathophysiology and Treatment of FSGS Recurrence (pages 266–274)

      P. Cravedi, J. B. Kopp and G. Remuzzi

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.12045

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      The authors review recent advancements in understanding the pathophysiology of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) recurrence after kidney transplant and critically discuss the current therapeutic options.

  6. Meeting Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. The AJT Report
    3. Literature Watch
    4. Editorials
    5. Comprehensive Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Meeting Reports
    8. Original Articles
    9. Brief Communication
    10. Case Report
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Book Reviews
    13. Images in Transplantation
    14. Letter to the Editor
    15. Erratum
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      What's New and What's Hot? Basic Science at the American Transplant Congress 2012 (pages 275–280)

      J. A. Fishman

      Article first published online: 27 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.12015

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      This article summarizes emerging insights from the American Transplant Congress 2012. Basic studies of the physiology of transplantation have revealed increased complexity of the mechanisms controlling immune function, notably at the interface of the innate and adaptive immune systems. See companion article by Humar (page 281) for a summary of clinical articles.

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      What's New and Hot in Clinical Organ Transplantation: Report From American Transplant Congress 2012 (pages 281–285)

      A. Humar

      Article first published online: 27 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.12014

      This article presents a summary of some of the most interesting and innovative clinical presentations from the 2012 American Transplant Congress. See article by Fishman (page 275) for a review of basic science presented at ATC 2012.

  7. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. The AJT Report
    3. Literature Watch
    4. Editorials
    5. Comprehensive Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Meeting Reports
    8. Original Articles
    9. Brief Communication
    10. Case Report
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Book Reviews
    13. Images in Transplantation
    14. Letter to the Editor
    15. Erratum
    1. Basic Science

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      External Inosculation as a Feature of Revascularization Occurs After Free Transplantation of Murine Liver Grafts (pages 286–298)

      A.-R. Kuehl, K. Abshagen, C. Eipel, M. W. Laschke, M. D. Menger, M. Laue and B. Vollmar

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2012.04336.x

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      Neonatal liver sections or sections retrieved from regenerating post-resective murine livers display a better transplant outcome and enhanced revascularization compared to sections from regular adult liver grafts, suggesting a potential role of the transplant condition to positively stimulate induction of angiogenesis, an essential requirement for hepatic free tissue transplantation.

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      Blockade of P-Selectin Is Sufficient to Reduce MHC I Antibody-Elicited Monocyte Recruitment In Vitro and In Vivo (pages 299–311)

      N. M. Valenzuela, L. Hong, X.-Da Shen, F. Gao, S. H. Young, E. Rozengurt, J. W. Kupiec-Weglinski, M. C. Fishbein and E. F. Reed

      Article first published online: 27 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.12016

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      The authors demonstrate that donor class I-specific antibody elicits endothelial exocytosis and P-selectindependent monocyte recruitment, and that the P-selectin antagonist rPSGL-1-Ig curbs macrophage accumulation in a murine cardiac allograft in response to these antibodies.

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      Belatacept and Sirolimus Prolong Nonhuman Primate Islet Allograft Survival: Adverse Consequences of Concomitant Alefacept Therapy (pages 312–319)

      M. C. Lowe, I. R. Badell, A. P. Turner, P. W. Thompson, F. V. Leopardi, E. A. Strobert, C. P. Larsen and A. D. Kirk

      Article first published online: 27 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2012.04341.x

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      This study demonstrates that a therapy combining belatacept and sirolimus effectively prevents acute islet allograft rejection in rhesus monkeys without the need for steroids or calcineurin inhibitors, and that the addition of alefacept induction promotes cytomegalovirus reactivation and fails to improve survival. See related article by Lo et al (page 320).

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      Belatacept and Sirolimus Prolong Nonhuman Primate Renal Allograft Survival Without a Requirement for Memory T Cell Depletion (pages 320–328)

      D. J. Lo, D. J. Anderson, T. A. Weaver, F. Leopardi, M. Song, A. B. Farris, E. A. Strobert, J. Jenkins, N. A. Turgeon, A. K. Mehta, C. P. Larsen and A. D. Kirk

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2012.04342.x

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      This study demonstrates that a therapy combining belatacept and sirolimus effectively prevents acute renal allograft rejection in rhesus monkeys, and that when these agents are optimally dosed, the addition of alefacept induction promotes cytomegalovirus reactivation and fails to improve survival. See related article by Lowe et al (page 312).

    5. Clinical Science

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      Does Expanded Criteria Donor Status Modify the Outcomes of Kidney Transplantation From Donors After Cardiac Death? (pages 329–336)

      S. K. Singh and S. J. Kim

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2012.04311.x

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      This observational cohort study using data from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients shows that deceased donor kidney transplantation from selected expanded criteria donors or donors after cardiac death may have acceptable outcomes. See editorial by McDonald and Clayton on page 249.

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      Optimizing the Program-Specific Reporting of Pancreas Transplant Outcomes (pages 337–347)

      B. L. Kasiske, S. Gustafson, N. Salkowski, P. G. Stock, D. A. Axelrod, R. Kandaswamy, E. F. Sleeman, J. Wainright, A. K. Israni and J. J. Snyder

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.12036

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      This report describes the results of combining cohorts of simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant, pancreas-afterkidney transplant, and pancreas transplant alone recipients to improve ascertainment of outcomes, and concludes that analyses based on the combined cohorts produce potentially useful models for reporting program-specific pancreas transplant outcomes. See editorial by Fridell and Stratta on page 251.

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      Safety and Efficacy of Subcutaneous Hepatitis B Immunoglobulin After Liver Transplantation: An Open Single-Arm Prospective Study (pages 348–352)

      G. G. Di Costanzo, A. G. Lanza, F. P. Picciotto, M. Imparato, C. Migliaccio, M. De Luca, V. Scuderi, R. Tortora, G. Cordone, W. Utech and F. Calise

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2012.04319.x

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      The authors demonstrate that subcutaneous hepatitis B immunoglobulin after liver transplantation is an effective delivery method for long-term hepatitis B virus prophylaxis. See related article by Cholongitas and Papatheodoridis (page 353).

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      High Genetic Barrier Nucleos(t)ide Analogue(s) for Prophylaxis From Hepatitis B Virus Recurrence After Liver Transplantation: A Systematic Review (pages 353–362)

      E. Cholongitas and G.V. Papatheodoridis

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2012.04315.x

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      The authors find that the use of hepatitis B immunoglobulin and a newer nucleos(t)ide analogue with high genetic barrier provides the best prophylaxis against HBV recurrence after liver transplantation. See related article by Di Costanzo et al (page 348).

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      Combined Liver Transplantation and Gastric Sleeve Resection for Patients With Medically Complicated Obesity and End-Stage Liver Disease (pages 363–368)

      J. K. Heimbach, K. D. S. Watt, J. J. Poterucha, N. Francisco Ziller, S. D. Cecco, M. R. Charlton, J. E. Hay, R. H. Wiesner, W. Sanchez, C. B. Rosen and J. M. Swain

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2012.04318.x

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      With a mean follow-up of 17 months, liver transplantation with simultaneous sleeve gastrectomy provided effective weight loss and reduced posttransplant metabolic complications.

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      Regional Variability in Liver Waiting List Removals Causes False Ascertainment of Waiting List Deaths (pages 369–375)

      M. D. Voigt, L. G. Hunsicker, J. J. Snyder, A. K. Israni and B. L. Kasiske

      Article first published online: 27 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.12000

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      The authors examine alternative ways of assuring complete documentation of deaths on the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) Liver Transplant Waiting List and report that the most accurate way is to add to OPTN-reported deaths on the list of all deaths reported in the Social Security Administration Death Master File that occurred within 90 days of a patient's being dropped from the list.

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      Late-Onset Cytomegalovirus (CMV) in Lung Transplant Recipients: Can CMV Serostatus Guide the Duration of Prophylaxis? (pages 376–382)

      K. E. Schoeppler, D. M. Lyu, T. J. Grazia, J. T. Crossno Jr., K. M. Vandervest and M. R. Zamora

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2012.04339.x

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      This retrospective study evaluates the proportion of lung transplant recipients who developed cytomegalovirus infection or disease following completion of 6 months of cytomegalovirus prophylaxis and demonstrates a significant difference between the three at-risk cytomegalovirus serostatuses.

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      Significance of and Risk Factors for the Development of Central Airway Stenosis After Lung Transplantation (pages 383–389)

      S. L. Shofer, M. M. Wahidi, W. A. Davis, S. M. Palmer, M. G. Hartwig, Y. Lu and L. D. Snyder

      Article first published online: 27 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.12017

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      The authors examine a large single-center cohort of lung transplantation patients for risk factors for the development of central airway stenosis and find strong associations with fungal infections, postoperative tracheostomy, and prolonged hospitalization after transplant, but not with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome or acute rejection.

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      Demographic, Metabolic, and Blood Pressure Characteristics of Living Kidney Donors Spanning Five Decades (pages 390–398)

      S. J. Taler, E. E. Messersmith, A. B. Leichtman, B. W. Gillespie, C. E. Kew, M. D. Stegall, R. M. Merion, A. J. Matas, H. N. Ibrahim and for the RELIVE Study Group

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2012.04321.x

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      The Renal and Lung Living Donors Evaluation (RELIVE) Study reports explosive growth in numbers of living kidney donors, particularly those between 41-60 years old; a 25% increase in the percentage of patients with obesity or glucose intolerance; steady, low rates of hypertension; and trends to higher median values for BMI, fasting glucose, and systolic blood pressure over five decades.

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      Inferior Early Posttransplant Outcomes for Recipients of Right Versus Left Deceased Donor Kidneys: An ANZDATA Registry Analysis (pages 399–405)

      H. Vacher-Coponat, S. McDonald, P. Clayton, A. Loundou, R. D. M. Allen and S. J. Chadban

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2012.04312.x

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      Recipients of right-sided, deceased donor kidneys incur higher risks of delayed graft function and early graft loss as compared to left-sided kidney recipients, which may have implications for organ allocation.

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      Cardiac Troponin T Before and After Kidney Transplantation: Determinants and Implications for Posttransplant Survival (pages 406–414)

      M. T. Keddis, Z. M. El-Zoghby, M. El Ters, E. Rodrigo, P. A. Pellikka, A. S. Jaffe and and F. G. Cosio

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2012.04317.x

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      The authors assess changes in cardiac troponin T levels after kidney transplantation and conclude that these levels drop rapidly after transplantation, their reduction is associated with decline in cardiovascular risk/death, and their change is dependent, in part, on allograft function.

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      Comparing Molecular Assessment of Implantation Biopsies With Histologic and Demographic Risk Assessment (pages 415–426)

      C. Kreepala, K. S. Famulski, J. Chang and P. F. Halloran

      Article first published online: 2 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.12043

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      The molecular acute kidney injury signal, measured by microarrays, emerges as the best predictor of early function in standard criteria deceased donor kidney transplants, but the application of this test to extended criteria donor kidneys is less predictive because donor age and allocation of such kidneys to high-risk recipients contribute to both short-term and long-term dysfunction.

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      Quantification of the Early Risk of Death in Elderly Kidney Transplant Recipients (pages 427–432)

      J. S. Gill, E. Schaeffner, S. Chadban, J. Dong, C. Rose, O. Johnston and J. Gill

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2012.04323.x

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      Quantification of the early posttransplant risk of death among kidney transplant recipients ≥ 65 years in the United States between 1995-2007 showed that in contrast to deceased donor transplantation, living donor transplantation eliminates or dramatically reduces the time to equal survival between transplant recipients and waitlist candidates, and that this advantage of living donor transplantation was evident in all cardiovascular risk groups.

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      Renal Transplantation in Systemic Amyloidosis—Importance of Amyloid Fibril Type and Precursor Protein Abundance (pages 433–441)

      J. H. Pinney, H. J. Lachmann, P. T. Sattianayagam, S. D. J. Gibbs, A. D. Wechalekar, C. P. Venner, C. J. Whelan, J. A. Gilbertson, D. Rowczenio, P. N. Hawkins and J. D. Gillmore

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2012.04326.x

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      This study compares renal transplant outcomes in the different types of renal amyloidosis and highlights amyloidrelated factors that determine eligibility for, and outcome with, renal transplantation.

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      The Effect of Everolimus Versus Mycophenolate Upon Proteinuria Following Kidney Transplant and Relationship to Graft Outcomes (pages 442–449)

      A. C. Wiseman, K. McCague, Y. Kim, F. Geissler and M. Cooper

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2012.04334.x

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      In a post-hoc analysis of a large randomized multicenter trial, the authors find a dose-dependent relationship of everolimus exposure and proteinuria, and describe the evolution of proteinuria from 3 to 24 months following transplant in CNI-containing regimens with everolimus or mycophenolate.

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      A Web-Based Application for Initial Screening of Living Kidney Donors: Development, Implementation and Evaluation (pages 450–457)

      D. R. Moore, I. D. Feurer, E. Y. Zavala, D. Shaffer, S. Karp, H. Hoy and D. E. Moore

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2012.04340.x

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      The authors describe an in-house interactive web-based application for the initial screening of live kidney donor candidates and find that its use increases the transplant center's ability to interface with donors and process them efficiently, and ultimately, increases live donor referrals.

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      The Time Course of Development and Impact From Viral Resistance Against Ganciclovir in Cytomegalovirus Infection (pages 458–466)

      C. da Cunha-Bang, N. Kirkby, M. Sønderholm, S. S. Sørensen, H. Sengeløv, M. Iversen, A. Rasmussen, F. Gustafsson, C. M. Frederiksen, J. Kjær, A. Cozzi Lepri and J. D. Lundgren

      Article first published online: 2 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.12042

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      Following sequence analyses of CMV UL97, treatment response to (val)ganciclovir was analyzed in episodes of posttransplant CMV infection, and the odds ratio of treatment failure was found to be significantly higher in episodes of infection where a signature ganciclovir-related mutation was found versus episodes of infection with only wild-type virus.

  8. Brief Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. The AJT Report
    3. Literature Watch
    4. Editorials
    5. Comprehensive Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Meeting Reports
    8. Original Articles
    9. Brief Communication
    10. Case Report
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Book Reviews
    13. Images in Transplantation
    14. Letter to the Editor
    15. Erratum
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      Ferret Lung Transplant: An Orthotopic Model of Obliterative Bronchiolitis (pages 467–473)

      H. Sui, A. K. Olivier, J. A. Klesney-Tait, L. Brooks, S. R. Tyler, X. Sun, A. Skopec, J. Kline, P. G. Sanchez, D. K. Meyerholz, N. Zavazava, M. Iannettoni, J. F. Engelhardt and K. R. Parekh

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2012.04337.x

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      The authors developed an orthotopic model of lung transplantation in the ferret that develops the entire spectrum of lung allograft pathology similar to humans, including acute rejection, lymphocytic bronchiolitis and obliterative bronchiolitis.

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      Effect of Corticosteroid Withdrawal on Tacrolimus and Mycophenolate Mofetil Exposure in a Randomized Multicenter Study (pages 474–484)

      F. S. Shihab, S. T. Lee, L. D. Smith, E. S. Woodle, J. D. Pirsch, A. O. Gaber, A. K. Henning, R. Reisfield, W. Fitzsimmons, J. Holman and M. R. First for the Astellas Corticosteroid Withdrawal Group

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2012.04327.x

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      In kidney transplant recipients, withdrawal of corticosteroids results in an increase in tacrolimus trough level and is associated with reduced mycophenolate mofetil dose.

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      Microcirculation Inflammation Associates With Outcome in Renal Transplant Patients With De Novo Donor-Specific Antibodies (pages 485–492)

      H. de Kort, M. Willicombe, P. Brookes, K. M. Dominy, E. Santos-Nunez, J. W. Galliford, K. Chan, D. Taube, A. G. McLean, H. T. Cook and C. Roufosse

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2012.04325.x

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      The authors demonstrate that in renal transplant patients with de novo donor-specific antibodies, the value of the microcirculation injury score (as defined by the combination of glomerulitis and peritubular capillaritis), measured in the first biopsy taken after donor-specific antibody occurrence, is associated with long-term renal graft survival.

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      A Form of Apolipoprotein A-I Is Found Specifically in Relapses of Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis Following Transplantation (pages 493–500)

      J. Lopez-Hellin, C. Cantarell, L. Jimeno, A. Sanchez-Fructuoso, N. Puig-Gay, L. Guirado, N. Vilariño, F. M. Gonzalez-Roncero, A. Mazuecos, R. Lauzurica, D. Burgos, J. S. Plumed, C. Jacobs-Cacha, C. Jimenez, A. Fernandez, P. Fernandez-Alvarez, V. Torregrosa, J. L. Nieto, A. Meseguer, A. Alonso and GREAT Study Group

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2012.04338.x

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      This study finds a modified form of apolipoprotein A-I, named Apo A-Ib, associated to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) relapses after transplantation; Apo A-Ib is present in the urine of relapsing idiopathic FSGS patients, while absent in non-relapsing FSGS, in familiar FSGS and in patients with FSGS-unrelated proteinuria.

  9. Case Report

    1. Top of page
    2. The AJT Report
    3. Literature Watch
    4. Editorials
    5. Comprehensive Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Meeting Reports
    8. Original Articles
    9. Brief Communication
    10. Case Report
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Book Reviews
    13. Images in Transplantation
    14. Letter to the Editor
    15. Erratum
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      Enteric Oxalate Nephropathy in the Renal Allograft: An Underrecognized Complication of Bariatric Surgery (pages 501–509)

      M. L. Troxell, D. C. Houghton, M. Hawkey, T. D. Batiuk and W. M. Bennett

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.12029

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      As more transplant patients undergo bariatric surgery, allograft oxalate nephropathy is likely to increase in prevalence; a high index of suspicion as well as thorough clinicopathologic correlation is needed for early diagnosis and appropriate management.

  10. Reports From the CDC: MMWR

    1. Top of page
    2. The AJT Report
    3. Literature Watch
    4. Editorials
    5. Comprehensive Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Meeting Reports
    8. Original Articles
    9. Brief Communication
    10. Case Report
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Book Reviews
    13. Images in Transplantation
    14. Letter to the Editor
    15. Erratum
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      Vital Signs: HIV Infection, Testing, and Risk Behaviors Among Youths—United States (pages 510–515)

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.12172

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      This report describes the epidemiology of HIV in persons aged 13-24 in the United States; nearly 60% were unaware of their infection, a situation that is relevant to donor organ utilization.

  11. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. The AJT Report
    3. Literature Watch
    4. Editorials
    5. Comprehensive Review
    6. Minireview
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    9. Brief Communication
    10. Case Report
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Book Reviews
    13. Images in Transplantation
    14. Letter to the Editor
    15. Erratum
    1. You have free access to this content
  12. Images in Transplantation

    1. Top of page
    2. The AJT Report
    3. Literature Watch
    4. Editorials
    5. Comprehensive Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Meeting Reports
    8. Original Articles
    9. Brief Communication
    10. Case Report
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Book Reviews
    13. Images in Transplantation
    14. Letter to the Editor
    15. Erratum
    1. CME

      You have free access to this content
      Fever, Abdominal Pain and Renal Failure in a Kidney Transplant Recipient (pages 518–520)

      A. Kher, K. E. Raven, Y. B. Kushner and and D. A. Mandelbrot*

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-6143.2012.04335.x

      • image
      • image
      • image
  13. Letter to the Editor

    1. Top of page
    2. The AJT Report
    3. Literature Watch
    4. Editorials
    5. Comprehensive Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Meeting Reports
    8. Original Articles
    9. Brief Communication
    10. Case Report
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Book Reviews
    13. Images in Transplantation
    14. Letter to the Editor
    15. Erratum
    1. You have free access to this content
    2. You have free access to this content
      Balancing Utility and Need by Means of Donor-to-Recipient Matching: A Challenging Problem (pages 522–523)

      A. W. Avolio, J. B. Halldorson, P. Burra, P. Dutkowski, S. Agnes and P. A. Clavien

      Article first published online: 2 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.12031

    3. You have free access to this content
      Incorporation of Donor Risk Into Liver Allocation Algorithms (pages 524–525)

      A. E. Braat, J. J. Blok, A. O. Rahmel, R. Adam, A. K. Burroughs, H. Putter, R. J. Porte, X. Rogiers and J. Ringers

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.12038

    4. You have free access to this content
      Interval Exercise Training in Adult Heart Transplant Recipients (page 526)

      K. L. Moraes, M. Fernandes and V. O. Carvalho

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.12051

    5. You have free access to this content
  14. Erratum

    1. Top of page
    2. The AJT Report
    3. Literature Watch
    4. Editorials
    5. Comprehensive Review
    6. Minireview
    7. Meeting Reports
    8. Original Articles
    9. Brief Communication
    10. Case Report
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Book Reviews
    13. Images in Transplantation
    14. Letter to the Editor
    15. Erratum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Erratum (page 528)

      Article first published online: 28 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.12057

      This article corrects:
    2. You have free access to this content

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