American Journal of Transplantation

Cover image for Vol. 17 Issue 2

February 2017

Volume 17, Issue 2

Pages 309–589

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. The AJT Report
    4. Literature Watch
    5. Editorials
    6. Minireviews
    7. Personal Viewpoint
    8. Original Articles
    9. Brief Communications
    10. Case Reports
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Images in Transplantation
    13. Letters to the Editor
    14. Errata
    1. You have free access to this content
      American Journal of Transplantation: Volume 17, Number 2, February 2017

      Version of Record online: 25 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.14176

      On the cover this month: Acquired immune responses are thought to be focused by specificity (e.g. foreign alloantigen), but are increasingly believed to be driven by broader signals indicating that a cell is in distress. This month, Matta et al (page 320) provide a concise update on alarmins—small molecules released from distressed cells that provoke immune activation and amplification. We also provide a minireview by Scozzi et al (page 328) that addresses neutrophils and their role in alloimmune response initiation, and an insightful paper by Lobb et al (page 341); also see the related editorial from Hauet and Thuillier on page 313 focusing on mitochondrial damage as a central source of innate signals of cellular injury. Together, these articles help shine light on the antigen-independent mechanisms of alloimmunity. Cover design by Scott Behm, Duke University Department of Surgery.

  2. The AJT Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. The AJT Report
    4. Literature Watch
    5. Editorials
    6. Minireviews
    7. Personal Viewpoint
    8. Original Articles
    9. Brief Communications
    10. Case Reports
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Images in Transplantation
    13. Letters to the Editor
    14. Errata
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cautious Optimism for Transplantation Under Trump Administration (pages 309–310)

      Lara C. Pullen

      Version of Record online: 25 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.14177

      This issue of “The AJT Report” looks at what a Trump administration may mean for the field of transplantation. Also this issue, we discuss recent arrests for organ trafficking in Egypt.

  3. Literature Watch

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. The AJT Report
    4. Literature Watch
    5. Editorials
    6. Minireviews
    7. Personal Viewpoint
    8. Original Articles
    9. Brief Communications
    10. Case Reports
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Images in Transplantation
    13. Letters to the Editor
    14. Errata
    1. You have free access to this content
      The Multiple Molecular Paths of Antibody Suppression by TFR Cells (page 311)

      Maria-Luisa Alegre

      Version of Record online: 25 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.14178

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      Sage et al demonstrate that T follicular regulatory cells durably inhibit B cells, in a cell contact–dependent manner, by altering B cell metabolism and the chromatin landscape of genes responsible for their effector functions, but IL-21 can prevent these changes and restore antibody production.

  4. Editorials

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. The AJT Report
    4. Literature Watch
    5. Editorials
    6. Minireviews
    7. Personal Viewpoint
    8. Original Articles
    9. Brief Communications
    10. Case Reports
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Images in Transplantation
    13. Letters to the Editor
    14. Errata
    1. You have free access to this content
      Protecting the Mitochondria Against Ischemia Reperfusion: A Gassy Solution? (pages 313–314)

      T. Hauet and R. Thuillier

      Version of Record online: 12 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.14150

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      In this editorial, the authors revisit the question of facing ischemia–reperfusion injury during the critically underused therapeutic window of organ preservation, through therapeutics aimed at protecting the central targets: mitochondria. See Lobb et al's article on page 341.

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      Developing Financial Incentives for Kidney Transplant Centers: Who Is Minding the Store? (pages 315–317)

      J. D. Schold and A. I. Reed

      Version of Record online: 12 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.14045

      Financial incentives may be a key policy reform to expand utilization of higher risk donor organs and promote the growth of transplantation. See the article from Axelrod et al on page 377.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Validation Is Critical for Genome-Wide Association Study–Based Associations (pages 318–319)

      W. S. Oetting, P. A. Jacobson and A. K. Israni

      Version of Record online: 12 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.14051

      The citation of genetic variants associated with clinical outcomes, found through the use of a genome-wide association study, needs to be critically evaluated until validation studies show that they are not false positives. Pihlstrøm et al's report is on page 528.

  5. Minireviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. The AJT Report
    4. Literature Watch
    5. Editorials
    6. Minireviews
    7. Personal Viewpoint
    8. Original Articles
    9. Brief Communications
    10. Case Reports
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Images in Transplantation
    13. Letters to the Editor
    14. Errata
    1. Alarmins and Their Receptors as Modulators and Indicators of Alloimmune Responses (pages 320–327)

      B. M. Matta, D. K. Reichenbach, B. R. Blazar and H. R. Turnquist

      Version of Record online: 12 JUL 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.13887

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      Released alarmins, or self-derived immunomodulatory molecules, can detect allograft rejection and are emerging as pleotropic molecules that augment inflammatory immune responses, but also support immune regulation and tissue repair.

    2. The Role of Neutrophils in Transplanted Organs (pages 328–335)

      D. Scozzi, M. Ibrahim, C. Menna, A. S. Krupnick, D. Kreisel and A. E. Gelman

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.13940

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      New insights into neutrophil function reveal their important role in stimulating alloimmunity as well as their potential for tolerance promotion.

  6. Personal Viewpoint

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. The AJT Report
    4. Literature Watch
    5. Editorials
    6. Minireviews
    7. Personal Viewpoint
    8. Original Articles
    9. Brief Communications
    10. Case Reports
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Images in Transplantation
    13. Letters to the Editor
    14. Errata
    1. Beyond the Billboard: The Facebook-Based Application, Donor, and Its Guided Approach to Facilitating Living Organ Donation (pages 336–340)

      K. A. Bramstedt and A. M. Cameron

      Version of Record online: 7 SEP 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.14004

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      This article presents an ethical analysis of the use of a smartphone app that helps patients find living donors.

  7. Original Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. The AJT Report
    4. Literature Watch
    5. Editorials
    6. Minireviews
    7. Personal Viewpoint
    8. Original Articles
    9. Brief Communications
    10. Case Reports
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Images in Transplantation
    13. Letters to the Editor
    14. Errata
    1. Basic Science

      Hydrogen Sulfide Protects Renal Grafts Against Prolonged Cold Ischemia–Reperfusion Injury via Specific Mitochondrial Actions (pages 341–352)

      I. Lobb, J. Jiang, D. Lian, W. Liu, A. Haig, M. N. Saha, R. Torregrossa, M. E. Wood, M. Whiteman and A. Sener

      Version of Record online: 29 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.14080

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      This study characterizes the protective effects for renal allografts conferred by hydrogen sulfide treatment during prolonged cold storage, and identifies mitochondria as potential sites of action for hydrogen sulfide during renal ischemia–reperfusion injury. See the editorial from Hauet and Thuillier on page 313.

    2. Impact of Mixed Xenogeneic Porcine Hematopoietic Chimerism on Human NK Cell Recognition in a Humanized Mouse Model (pages 353–364)

      H. W. Li, P. Vishwasrao, M. A. Hölzl, S. Chen, G. Choi, G. Zhao and M. Sykes

      Version of Record online: 10 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.13957

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      In a humanized mouse model, human natural killer cells induced in the presence of pig hematopoietic chimerism demonstrate either specific hyporesponsiveness to pig cells or global hyporesponsiveness in terms of cytotoxicity and cytokine responses in vitro.

    3. Anakinra Protects Against Serum Deprivation-Induced Inflammation and Functional Derangement in Islets Isolated From Nonhuman Primates (pages 365–376)

      S.-M. Jin, W. Shim, B. J. Oh, S.-H. Oh, S. J. Yu, J. M. Choi, H. J. Park, J. B. Park and J. H. Kim

      Version of Record online: 15 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.13953

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      Serum deprivation induces accumulation of islet amyloid polypeptide oligomers and proinflammatory responses in cultured isolated islets, and supplementing the culture medium with anakinra attenuates the functional impairment and proinflammatory responses induced by serum deprivation in ex vivo culture of nonhuman primate islets.

    4. Clinical Science

      The Changing Financial Landscape of Renal Transplant Practice: A National Cohort Analysis (pages 377–389)

      D. A. Axelrod, M. A. Schnitzler, H. Xiao, A. S. Naik, D. L. Segev, V. R. Dharnidharka, D. C. Brennan and K. L. Lentine

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.14018

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      A national cohort study examines the implications of increasing donor and recipient complexity on the cost of and reimbursement for transplant. See the editorial from Schold and Reed on page 315.

    5. Local Expansion of Donation After Circulatory Death Kidney Transplant Activity Improves Waitlisted Outcomes and Addresses Inequities of Access to Transplantation (pages 390–400)

      B. Mirshekar-Syahkal, D. Summers, L. L. Bradbury, M. Aly, V. Bardsley, M. Berry, J. M. Norris, N. Torpey, M. R. Clatworthy, J. A. Bradley and G. J. Pettigrew

      Version of Record online: 26 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.13968

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      The authors report the impact on a single center's kidney waitlist population following local expansion in circulatory death donation, show a survival advantage for young listed patients, and address inequity of access to transplantation for elderly recipients.

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Screening of Living Kidney Donors for Genetic Diseases Using a Comprehensive Genetic Testing Strategy (pages 401–410)

      C. P. Thomas, M. A. Mansilla, R. Sompallae, S. O. Mason, C. J. Nishimura, M. J. Kimble, C. A. Campbell, A. E. Kwitek, B. W. Darbro, Z. A. Stewart and R. J. H. Smith

      Version of Record online: 24 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.13970

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      A pilot study validates the benefit of screening living donors at risk for genetic kidney disease with a comprehensive targeted multigene panel to exclude genetic disease and to facilitate risk assessment and counseling.

    7. Transplantation of Kidneys From Donors With Acute Kidney Injury: Friend or Foe? (pages 411–419)

      C. Boffa, F. van de Leemkolk, E. Curnow, J. Homan van der Heide, J. Gilbert, E. Sharples and R. J. Ploeg

      Version of Record online: 25 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.13966

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      This analysis of the UK transplant registry investigates the use of kidneys from deceased donors with acute kidney injury and analyzes the outcomes of transplanted kidneys with injury.

    8. Allelic and Epitopic Characterization of Intra–Kidney Allograft Anti-HLA Antibodies at Allograft Nephrectomy (pages 420–431)

      D. Milongo, N. Kamar, A. Del Bello, C. Guilbeau-Frugier, F. Sallusto, L. Esposito, G. Dörr, A. Blancher and N. Congy-Jolivet

      Version of Record online: 26 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.13958

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      Analysis of anti-HLA antibodies eluted from a failed kidney allograft reveals that these antibodies are also in the sera and directed against the donor epitopes.

    9. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A Steady-State Head-to-Head Pharmacokinetic Comparison of All FK-506 (Tacrolimus) Formulations (ASTCOFF): An Open-Label, Prospective, Randomized, Two-Arm, Three-Period Crossover Study (pages 432–442)

      S. Tremblay, V. Nigro, J. Weinberg, E. S. Woodle and R. R. Alloway

      Version of Record online: 2 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.13935

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      This study evaluates the pharmacokinetic profile of three tacrolimus formulations and shows significant differences, highlighting the higher per mg exposure and a lower peak and delayed peak of extended-release tacrolimus tablets when compared to the two other capsule formulations.

    10. Sitagliptin Treatment After Total Pancreatectomy With Islet Autotransplantation: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study (pages 443–450)

      M. D. Bellin, G. J. Beilman, T. B. Dunn, T. L. Pruett, D. E. R. Sutherland, S. Chinnakotla, J. S. Hodges, A. Lane, P. Ptacek, K. L. Berry, B. J. Hering and A. Moran

      Version of Record online: 26 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.13979

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      In this randomized, placebo-controlled trial, treatment with once-daily sitagliptin for 1 year after total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplant did not improve diabetes outcomes at 12 or 18 months posttransplant.

    11. Key Matrix Proteins Within the Pancreatic Islet Basement Membrane Are Differentially Digested During Human Islet Isolation (pages 451–461)

      S. E. Cross, R. H. Vaughan, A. J. Willcox, A. J. McBride, A. A. Abraham, B. Han, J. D. Johnson, E. Maillard, P. A. Bateman, R. D. Ramracheya, P. Rorsman, K. E. Kadler, M. J. Dunne, S. J. Hughes and P. R. V. Johnson

      Version of Record online: 6 SEP 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.13975

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      This study characterizes the human islet basement membrane before and after islet isolation, demonstrating that substantial disruption of both layers of the duplex basement membrane occurs during the procedure, potentially compromising islet survival.

    12. Anti-Donor HLA Antibody Response After Pancreatic Islet Grafting: Characteristics, Risk Factors, and Impact on Graft Function (pages 462–473)

      E. Pouliquen, P. Baltzinger, A. Lemle, C.-C. Chen, A. Parissiadis, S. Borot, L. Frimat, S. Girerd, T. Berney, S. Lablanche, P. Y. Benhamou, E. Morelon, L. Badet, V. Dubois, L. Kessler, O. Thaunat and for the GRAGIL Network

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.13936

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      This multicenter study provides an in-depth characterization of donor-specific antibody response after pancreatic islet grafting, identifies immunosuppressive drug withdrawal as the main risk factor for donor-specific antibody generation, and demonstrates that, in contrast with solid organ transplantation, donor-specific antibodies have no deleterious impact on islet graft function.

    13. Donor-Derived Exosomes With Lung Self-Antigens in Human Lung Allograft Rejection (pages 474–484)

      M. Gunasekaran, Z. Xu, D. K. Nayak, M. Sharma, R. Hachem, R. Walia, R. M. Bremner, M. A. Smith and T. Mohanakumar

      Version of Record online: 16 JUL 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.13915

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      Alloimmune responses induce exosomes with lung-associated self-antigens and regulatory microRNA, enabling the spread of immune responses that lead to lung allograft rejection.

    14. Simulated Regionalization of Heart and Lung Transplantation in the United States (pages 485–495)

      J. T. Magruder, A. S. Shah, T. C. Crawford, J. C. Grimm, B. Kim, J. B. Orens, E. L. Bush, R. S. Higgins and C. A. Merlo

      Version of Record online: 12 SEP 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.13967

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      A simulation algorithm that refers heart and lung transplant patients from low- to high-volume centers in each transplant region suggests such an approach could reduce 1-year mortality, but would also impose significant and difficult-to-measure socioeconomic costs on patients.

    15. Molecular Assessment of Microcirculation Injury in Formalin-Fixed Human Cardiac Allograft Biopsies With Antibody-Mediated Rejection (pages 496–505)

      B. Afzali, E. Chapman, M. Racapé, B. Adam, P. Bruneval, F. Gil, D. Kim, L. Hidalgo, P. Campbell, B. Sis, J. P. Duong Van Huyen and M. Mengel

      Version of Record online: 2 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.13956

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      This study assesses a set of 34 endothelial, natural killer cell and inflammatory genes for molecular diagnostics in human formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded heart allograft biopsies, and suggests that biopsy-based molecular assessment of antibody-mediated microcirculation injury has the potential to improve diagnostics from cardiac transplants.

    16. Does Lung Donation by Heart Donors Have an Impact on Survival in Heart Transplant Recipients? (pages 506–511)

      Y. Xia, P. Friedmann, R. Bello, D. Goldstein and D. D'Alessandro

      Version of Record online: 25 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.13981

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      Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression of data from the United Network for Organ Sharing registry finds that lung donation by heart donors does not have an impact on survival in heart transplant recipients.

    17. Waitlist Outcomes of Liver Transplant Candidates Who Were Reprioritized Under Share 35 (pages 512–518)

      E. K. H. Chow, A. B. Massie, X. Luo, C. E. Wickliffe, S. E. Gentry, A. M. Cameron and D. L. Segev

      Version of Record online: 24 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.13980

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      In a national study of liver transplant candidates, the majority of local candidates who lost priority to regional MELD 35+ candidates were eventually transplanted, but 21% of those with comparably high MELDs died while still on the waitlist.

    18. Changes in Utilization and Discard of Hepatitis C–Infected Donor Livers in the Recent Era (pages 519–527)

      M. G. Bowring, L. M. Kucirka, A. B. Massie, X. Luo, A. Cameron, M. Sulkowski, K. Rakestraw, A. Gurakar, I. Kuo, D. L. Segev and C. M. Durand

      Version of Record online: 24 AUG 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.13976

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      In this registry-based study, the authors report that in the era of highly effective antiviral therapies for hepatitis C (HCV), use of HCV+ donor livers has increased, outcomes after HCV+ transplantation are comparable to HCV– transplantation, and yet discard rates of HCV+ livers remain elevated.

  8. Brief Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. The AJT Report
    4. Literature Watch
    5. Editorials
    6. Minireviews
    7. Personal Viewpoint
    8. Original Articles
    9. Brief Communications
    10. Case Reports
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Images in Transplantation
    13. Letters to the Editor
    14. Errata
    1. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Long-Term Clinical Outcome in Renal Transplant Patients: A Validation Study (pages 528–533)

      H. K. Pihlstrøm, G. Mjøen, S. Mucha, G. Haraldsen, A. Franke, A. Jardine, B. Fellström, H. Holdaas and E. Melum

      Version of Record online: 19 SEP 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.13995

      Although a previous genome-wide association study suggested an association between two single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosomes 14 and 18 and long-term clinical outcomes in kidney transplantation, this validation study in a larger cohort of renal allograft recipients cannot confirm those findings. Oetting et al's editorial is on page 318.

    2. Optimizing Outcomes in Pediatric Renal Transplantation Through the Australian Paired Kidney Exchange Program (pages 534–541)

      M. P. Sypek, S. I. Alexander, L. Cantwell, F. L. Ierino, P. Ferrari, A. M. Walker and J. Y. Kausman

      Version of Record online: 14 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.14041

      This report describes a cohort of pediatric recipients transplanted through the Australian Kidney Exchange and explores how kidney paired donation programs facilitate transplantation and optimize outcomes for children with end-stage kidney disease.

    3. Prospective Analyses of Circulating B Cell Subsets in ABO-Compatible and ABO-Incompatible Kidney Transplant Recipients (pages 542–550)

      H. A. Schlößer, M. Thelen, G. Dieplinger, A. von Bergwelt-Baildon, M. Garcia-Marquez, S. Reuter, A. Shimabukuro-Vornhagen, K. Wennhold, N. Haustein, D. Buchner, N. Heiermann, R. Kleinert, R. Wahba, V. Ditt, C. Kurschat, T. Cingöz, J. Becker, D. L. Stippel and M. von Bergwelt-Baildon

      Version of Record online: 23 SEP 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.14013

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      This prospective study describes the evolution of circulating B cell subsets following renal transplantation and a significant alteration of the B cell compartment during rejection.

    4. Association Between Duration of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)–1 Viral Suppression Prior to Renal Transplantation and Acute Cellular Rejection (pages 551–556)

      J. Husson, K. Stafford, J. Bromberg, A. Haririan, T. Sparkes, C. Davis, R. Redfield and A. Amoroso

      Version of Record online: 19 SEP 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.13985

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      A longer duration of HIV viral suppression before renal transplantation may lead to lower rates of acute cellular rejection posttransplantation.

  9. Case Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. The AJT Report
    4. Literature Watch
    5. Editorials
    6. Minireviews
    7. Personal Viewpoint
    8. Original Articles
    9. Brief Communications
    10. Case Reports
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Images in Transplantation
    13. Letters to the Editor
    14. Errata
    1. Immediate and Catastrophic Antibody-Mediated Rejection in a Lung Transplant Recipient With Anti–Angiotensin II Receptor Type 1 and Anti–Endothelin-1 Receptor Type A Antibodies (pages 557–564)

      E. Cozzi, F. Calabrese, M. Schiavon, P. Feltracco, M. Seveso, C. Carollo, M. Loy, M. Cardillo and F. Rea

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.14053

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      The authors investigate the cause of the immediate and catastrophic antibody-mediated rejection in a lung transplant recipient with no donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies and find that preexisting anti–angiotensin II receptor type 1 and anti–endothelin-1 receptor type A antibodies may play a detrimental role.

    2. Inguinal Herniation Containing Bladder, Causing Contralateral Allograft Hydroureteronephrosis—A Case Report and Literature Review (pages 565–568)

      T. du Toit, L. Kaestner, E. Muller and D. Kahn

      Version of Record online: 27 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.14052

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      The authors present the first case report of inguinal herniation causing contralateral allograft hydroureteronephrosis.

    3. Kidney Transplantation From a Donor With Sickle Cell Disease (pages 569–571)

      A. Rossidis, M. A. Lim, M. Palmer, M. H. Levine, A. Naji, R. D. Bloom and P. L. Abt

      Version of Record online: 21 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.14063

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      The authors report the successful transplantation of two kidneys from a donor with sickle cell disease and discuss expanding the donor pool with selective utilization of donors with this condition.

  10. Reports From the CDC: MMWR

    1. Top of page
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    3. The AJT Report
    4. Literature Watch
    5. Editorials
    6. Minireviews
    7. Personal Viewpoint
    8. Original Articles
    9. Brief Communications
    10. Case Reports
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Images in Transplantation
    13. Letters to the Editor
    14. Errata
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      Announcement: Guidance for U.S. Laboratory Testing for Zika Virus Infection: Implications for Health Care Providers (page 572)

      Version of Record online: 25 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.14179

      This report provides links to currently available testing for Zika virus.

  11. Images in Transplantation

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. The AJT Report
    4. Literature Watch
    5. Editorials
    6. Minireviews
    7. Personal Viewpoint
    8. Original Articles
    9. Brief Communications
    10. Case Reports
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Images in Transplantation
    13. Letters to the Editor
    14. Errata
    1. CME

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      Painful Groin Mass in a Liver Transplant Recipient (pages 573–575)

      A. S. Barbas, M. Elmi, S. Fischer and G. Sapisochin

      Version of Record online: 25 JAN 2017 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.14079

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  12. Letters to the Editor

    1. Top of page
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    3. The AJT Report
    4. Literature Watch
    5. Editorials
    6. Minireviews
    7. Personal Viewpoint
    8. Original Articles
    9. Brief Communications
    10. Case Reports
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Images in Transplantation
    13. Letters to the Editor
    14. Errata
    1. You have free access to this content
      The White House Organ Summit (page 576)

      D. K. C. Cooper

      Version of Record online: 14 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.14056

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      Criminal Organ Retrieval: Unconscionable (page 577)

      T. L. Pruett, A. Vathsala, T. Berney, J. Lerut, J. S. Odorico, M. Johnson, H. Egawa, F. Gonzalez-Martinez, M. Haberal, N. L. Ascher and A. K. Chandraker

      Version of Record online: 3 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.14028

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      Miscommunicating NOTA Can Be Costly to Living Donors (pages 578–580)

      M. Mittelman, C. Thiessen, W. J. Chon, K. Clayville, D. C. Cronin, J. S. Fisher, S. Fry-Revere, J. A. Gross, J. Hanneman, M. L. Henderson, K. Ladin, H. Mysel, L. A. Sherman, L. Willock and E. J. Gordon

      Version of Record online: 3 OCT 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.14036

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      Mycophenolate and Pregnancy: Teratology Principles and National Transplantation Pregnancy Registry Experience (pages 581–582)

      M. J. Moritz, S. Constantinescu, L. A. Coscia and D. Armenti

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.14085

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  13. Errata

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. The AJT Report
    4. Literature Watch
    5. Editorials
    6. Minireviews
    7. Personal Viewpoint
    8. Original Articles
    9. Brief Communications
    10. Case Reports
    11. Reports From the CDC: MMWR
    12. Images in Transplantation
    13. Letters to the Editor
    14. Errata
    1. You have free access to this content
      Erratum (page 587)

      Version of Record online: 21 DEC 2016 | DOI: 10.1111/ajt.14168

      This article corrects:
    2. You have free access to this content

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